Another Beaver Valley/Castlegar Murdoch Final, another Game seven

first_imgFor the second time in as many seasons the Beaver Valley Nitehawks and Castlegar Rebels will need a Game seven to determine the Murdoch Division Champion.The Hawks, paced by Kootenay International Junior Hockey League scoring leader Ryan Edwards, forced a deciding game by stopping the Rebels 5-0 in Fruitvale.Edwards scored twice to lead the Hawks.In three series wins against the Rebels, Edwards has scored five times for seven points. In three Castlegar wins, Jordan Gluck has allowed four goals.Gluck did not finish the game Monday and was replaced by Connor Beachamp five minutes into the third period.So it’s safe to say the star that shows up will no doubt have a say in the final outcome.That is unless a role player like Justin Niminken steps up like he did in 2012, scoring the game-winning goal with three minutes remaining in the game to spark the Hawks to a 5-3 win in Game seven.Game time is 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in Castlegar.The winner advances to the Kootenay Conference Final against the Golden/Fernie champ.last_img read more

Team Grads 2004-05 captures Third Annual Bomber Alumni Basketball Tournament

first_imgTeam Grads 2004-05 dumped the LVR Senior Bombers 83-70 to clinch the title with a 3-0 record.Again the Joseph Brothers, David and Florian, and Braden Klein and Jake Phelan led the three-time champs.Team 2003, consisting of players from the 2000 BC Juvenile and 2001 BC Junior Boy’s Basketball Champions, finished tied for second with Team Rickaby. Both teams ended with 2-1 records.Team 2011 took fourth spot ahead of the LVR Bombers in the five-team tournament.Team Grads 2004-05consists of David Joseph, Florian Joseph, Braden Klein, Jake Phelan, Ryan Golik, Brendan Melanson, Ben Irving and Jordan Melanson. Team Grads 2004-05 made it a three-peat at the Third Annual Bomber Alumni Basketball Tournament Boxing Day at the L.V. Rogers Hangar.The tournament was in memory of longtime LVR Bomber coach Blair D’Andrea with proceeds of the event going to the Blair D’Andrea Alumni Scholarship Society fund supporting post-secondary athletes and grassroots basketball development in the West Kootenays. last_img read more

Forecasts predict at least one good rain event per week for the rest of August

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jim Noel, NOAASummer rainfall has been on a wild swing. We have been going back and forth from wet to dry and now we are looking toward a bit wetter pattern again.The outlook for the rest of August calls for slightly above normal temperatures (about 1 to 2 degrees F). Rainfall will likely average 2 to 4 inches with normal being near 3 inches inches. Isolated totals could reach 5 inches through the end of August.Going into harvest season things have been changing. Current climate models are continue the trends of temperatures 1 to 3 degrees F above normal through November. However, trends are also gradually wetting up in fall. Rainfall goes from near normal in September to above normal by October into November. We will continue to monitor this trend but early harvest conditions look pretty good but later harvest conditions look more questionable.last_img read more

McIlroy confirms he’ll return for FedEx Cup opener

first_imgTrump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Swim star Schooling ‘really sorry’ for Malaysia jibe This season’s series opens with the Northern Trust in New York next week, followed by the Dell Technologies Championship in Boston a week later.After a week off, they series resumes with the BMW Championship before the top 30 in the FedEx Cup standings advance to the Tour Championship.McIlroy seemed confident he would be playing through the BMW Championship when he posted a note to fans on Twitter on Friday — urging them to enter a contest to win a chance to play 18 holes with him at the tournament in Illinois.ADVERTISEMENT He said the effects of a broken rib suffered early in the season continued to hinder his practice and had led to back spasms.But the 28-year-old decided to take a stab at defending his FedEx Cup crown after meeting with fitness adviser Steve McGregor in Belfast, the Daily Telegraph reported.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingMcIlroy won the second playoff event and the Tour Championship to clinch the FedEx Cup last year.Just like last year, he has not won a title prior to the playoff series. NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ LATEST STORIES View commentscenter_img Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR CHARLOTTE, NC – AUGUST 12: Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland reacts to a putt on the fourth green during the third round of the 2017 PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club on August 12, 2017 in Charlotte, North Carolina. Stuart Franklin/Getty Images/AFPWorld number four Rory McIlroy is in the field for next week’s Northern Trust Open, first event of the US PGA’s FedEx Cup playoffs won by the Northern Ireland star last year.McIlroy had indicated after a disappointing 22nd-place finish in the PGA Championship that he might sit out the rest of the year.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claimlast_img read more

Cignal guns for crown vs CEU five

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Continent’s best gear up for Asian Karting Open Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Cignal took Game 1, 78-56, in Game 1 last Tuesday. —JASMINE W. PAYOSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters View comments Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul LATEST STORIES Cignal HD may have enough tools to complete a championship sweep but coach Boyet Fernandez reminded how Centro Escolar University could spoil any favorite. ADVERTISEMENT So Fernandez wants his wards to play consistently when his Hawkeyes go for the crown in the 2017 PBA D-League Foundation Cup on Thursday.“This is a team capable of coming back and if you give them that chance, then we have a problem,” Fernandez said of the Scorpions, who stunned No. 1 Flying V in the semifinals.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingThe Scorpions, who rose from a 0-1 deficit in the semifinals, hope to replicate that feat and force a decider in Game 2 of the best-of-three finals at 5 p.m. at Ynares Sports Arena in Pasig City.“We’re not quitting,” said CEU coach Yong Garcia. “I always push my players to give their best and come out competing. That’s important because it’s not often that we reach the championship.” MOST READlast_img read more

100 years later Toronto genealogists help soldiers family find his burial site

first_imgTORONTO ONTARIO, – After a search that spanned nearly a century, genealogists in Toronto have helped a Scottish family track down the unmarked grave of a relative who died after serving in the First World War and see him honoured in a military ceremony.Ian Hector Steven’s family knew that he emigrated to Canada from Glasgow in the early 20th century and had married.They knew Hector, as he was known, had enlisted in the Canadian military, because he sent home a photo of himself in uniform. They learned he had been wounded from a newspaper story about the war, and found out he had died when they received a Memorial Cross, a medal sent to the mothers of fallen soldiers.But for years they didn’t know the circumstances of his death, whether he left behind any children, or where he was buried.The search for Hector’s descendents began shortly after his death. His sisters posted notices in Canadian newspapers, hoping his widow would get in touch, but they never heard back. When the Second World War broke out and Canadian troops were sent to Europe, Hector’s family hoped one of his descendents might seek them out.“When the war ended in 1945 and no young Canadian had come and rattled the door and said that he was the son of or the daughter of Ian Hector, the matter just went dead within the family,” said Hector’s nephew, Rev. Harold Steven. On a visit to the Parliament buildings in Ottawa while he was in Canada visiting his son at McGill University about 10 years ago, Steven figured it couldn’t hurt to look for his uncle’s name in the Book of Remembrance, but he wasn’t surprised when he didn’t find anything. He had essentially given up on finding his uncle — until about 18 months ago.By chance, Steven, now in his mid-80s, came across an article in The Scots magazine about a new history project at the University of Edinburgh. Researchers were looking for the “war dead who had slipped through the net of recognition,” as he put it. A historian at the university put him in touch with another Scottish researcher, who found that Hector had lived in Toronto. When Steven contacted the Toronto city clerk’s office, archivist Gillian Reddyhoff suggested he get in touch with Mount Pleasant Group of Cemeteries, which could check if Hector was listed on any of their 10 sites.He wasn’t — but the manager of the cemetery’s genealogy team, Sue Henderson, was intrigued. She got in touch with Heather Ioannou, who she knew from the Toronto branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society. Ioannou, who has lived in Canada for decades but was raised in Scotland, was equally interested. She searched through Ontario’s vital statistics archive and found a record of Hector’s 1918 death in the York County Death Registry.“I sent it to Sue, and we both went to Google Maps, and it was like somebody smacking us over the head,” she said. The address listed as the site of Hector’s death was just down the street from St. John’s Norway Cemetery in Toronto’s east end.Ioannou and Henderson were able to confirm with the cemetery’s staff that Hector was in fact buried in St. John’s. Finally, Steven had an answer to the question his family had been unable to answer for decades. “They found him,” he said. “I was thrilled to bits.”That discovery allowed Ioannou and Henderson to rapidly uncover more information: the precise date and location of Hector’s arrival in Canada (he arrived in Quebec’s Eastern Townships in May 1913), his cause of death (bronchial pneumonia after influenza, sustained as a result of a military injury). War diaries from his regiment, discovered by Ioannou, showed that Hector had fought as part of Canadian expeditionary forces in France.Hector was buried with his wife, an English woman named Evie Lacey, who had died of the Spanish flu 11 days after her husband. The grave was unmarked because it belonged to Lacey’s mother, who likely couldn’t afford a headstone, and who returned to England shortly after her daughter’s death.Because the grave’s deed was registered to someone outside the Steven family, they weren’t legally allowed to set up a headstone. So Steven contacted the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, which ruled that because Hector’s death was related to his war injuries, he was eligible for a military headstone.On Sunday, 104 years to the day that Hector had first arrived in Canada, the War Graves Commission honoured the soldier with a headstone dedication ceremony at St. John’s Norway Cemetery. Members of the seventh regiment of the Royal Canadian Artillery paid their respects, and a military band played.Dominique Boulais of the War Graves Commission called the ceremony “the last significant step in marking the final resting place of our fallen comrade.” Hector’s grave, he said, was no longer “an impersonal and faceless tomb.”Several wreaths were laid at the new headstone.“For nearly a hundred years my uncle’s grave was unknown,” Steven said. “Today he is remembered with honour and commemorated in perpetuity.”The ceremony was also attended by the Canadian researchers and genealogists who helped the Steven family.Ioannou said finding an answer to the questions surrounding Hector’s death was gratifying, because in many cases, records of war deaths are difficult to track down. The Ontario Genealogical Society searches for war deaths “literally every day,” she said. “There are some families who never know what happened to their loved one.”Connie Culbertson, chair of the Toronto branch of the OGS, was also happy to be there. “We were so pleased to be able to help,” she said. “We love stories.”Reddyhoff agreed: looking for the next clue was “like a detective story.”Working with city archives, she said she frequently hears from people early in their searches. “You don’t always hear the end of the story,” she said. “It’s wonderful to hear that it came to fruition.”last_img read more

ZERO DIVERSITY AMONG NOMINEES FOR QUEBEC TV VIEWERS CHOICE AWARDS

center_img Fabienne Colas is an actress and has founded a number of black film festivals across Canada, including the Montreal Black Film Festival. (Alain-Julien Godbout/Radio-Canada) It’s not as if there aren’t enough people of colour to choose from, she said, noting roughly 15 per cent of her 8,500 active members are second-generation immigrants. The number climbs to 25 per cent if third-generation immigrants are included, she added.There are many actors of colour on Quebec television, Prégent said, but there are very few in leading roles on the most popular shows. Therefore, she explained, those actors aren’t top of mind when Quebecers vote for their favourite stars.The Artis awards are based on the results of a multi-layered poll of 8,000 Quebecers, conducted twice a year by the Leger firm.At the end of November, about 2,000 Quebecers — half online and half by telephone — are asked to spontaneously list their favourite television star in 14 categories, including drama series, sports, news and variety shows.The firm calculates the top five choices and polls another 2,000 Quebecers, asking them to pick their favourites among the names chosen by the first group. Leger repeats the process with another 4,000 people at the end of January.Christian Bourque, Leger’s executive vice-president, said the nominees “tend to be the main characters of the most popular shows because they get the most visibility…. It’s more of a popularity contest.”Keeping up with the timesAnd that’s precisely the problem, said Jérôme Pruneau, head of Diversité artistique Montreal, a group trying to promote cultural diversity in the arts and culture scene in Quebec’s largest city. Through the arts, Quebecers are presented with an identity that is a “white, francophone fantasy,” he said.In the 1960s, when the Quebec nation was shedding its Catholic identity, the arts industry played a major role in the construction of its culture and in the protection of the French language, he said. Today, Pruneau added, the imagined Quebec culture hasn’t kept up with the times.“We have the impression that this is the only identity that represents us,” he said, “and it’s what we see unfortunately on our television shows, in the theatre, in our politics and in the public space — a little bit everywhere.”Haitian-born Quebec actress Fabienne Colas called Monday’s announcement of the Artis nominations “a sad day” for Quebec.“And especially since the majority of the nominees are from Montreal — our city, which is one of the most multi-ethnic in North America.”Her solution is for broadcasters to demand diversity quotas in shows broadcast on their networks.“When there are clear quotas, we have the urgency to find the talent,” she said. “When there aren’t any, we find all the reasons in the world not to integrate diversity.” Advertisement Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

Province says women reaching parity on board agency appointments

first_imgEDMONTON – The Alberta government says it is achieving gender parity for those appointed to its agencies, boards, and commissions.Stephanie McLean, the minister for Service Alberta, says one third of board members were women in March 2015.Today, that number is 48 per cent as the government has filled more than 700 positions.McLean says it reflects a government approach to actively recruit more women.There are more than 280 agencies boards and commissions that work at arm’s-length from the government.The province is reviewing the mandates of all boards and has already reduced or amalgamated 26 of them to streamline service and save $33 million.last_img

Fort St John Home Hardware wins company award

first_imgHome Hardware said that to receive an award, recipients must demonstrate excellence in staff performance and customer service; interior presentation, including clear signage, tidiness, and merchandise presentation and displays; exterior presentation, including cleanliness and attractive window displays; staff training; and participation in dealer network initiatives. Dealer-Owners must also represent strong community support and leadership within their local community.“The Proud of My Home Award recognizes Fort St. John Home Hardware Building Centre’s commitment and dedication to providing their community with quality advice, superior service and competitively priced products that are second to none,” said Terry Davis, President and CEO, Home Hardware Stores Limited. “Fort St. John Home Hardware Building Centre truly embodies the values on which Home Hardware was founded on which include value, service and dependability. On behalf of the Dealer-Owners of close to 1,100 Home Hardware Stores in communities across Canada, I would like to congratulate Fort St. John Home Hardware Building Centre on this achievement.” FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Home Hardware Building Centre in Fort St. John received the 2018 Paul Straus Public Relations Award at Home Hardware’s annual Spring Market on April 14th in St. Jacobs, Ontario. The award was a part of the Home Hardware Proud of My Home Awards which acknowledged the top stores in the country. Dealer-Owners Doug and Shelley Gallinger say they’re honoured to be one of seven stores recognized in the awards categories from among the nearly 1,100 stores across Canada.“We are deeply honoured to be acknowledged with the Proud of my Home designation for the Paul Straus Public Relations Award,” said Doug and Shelley Gallinger. “This award would not have been made possible without the hard work and dedication of our staff and local community. A special thank you goes to our customers for their support.”last_img read more