Brazilian Army Invests in Cyber Defense

first_imgBy Taciana Moury/Diálogo May 12, 2017 The Brazilian government’s priority for cyber defense and protection from cyberattacks has led to the emergence since 2016 of a new unit within the Brazilian Army (EB, per its Portuguese acronym): the Cyber Defense Command (ComDCiber, per its Portuguese acronym). This new command plays a part in the National Defense Strategy, and in April it completed its first year of operation. ComDCiber’s main purpose is to plan, coordinate, direct, integrate, and supervise cyber operations in the defense area. The creation of ComDCiber is one of the actions taken under the Cyber Defense Program in National Defense. According to information released during LAAD Defence & Security 2017 in Rio de Janeiro in April, the project is valued at about $104 million and includes the development of hardware and software solutions, and the procurement of supercomputers and digital research materials to foster the growth of this field in Brazil. Brazilian cyber defense has evolved over the course of large events hosted by the nation, such as the World Cup in 2014, and the Olympics in 2016. According to ComDCiber, there was a huge preparatory effort made by the Brazilian Armed Forces in the periods leading up to those large events, including personnel training and technology investments in the sector. ComDCiber projects According to information from ComDCiber, several projects are being developed by this new unit, including the creation of a National Cyber Defense Academy. The academy’s purpose is to train civilian and military human resources so they can act effectively against cyber threats. Another project is the Cyber Defense Products Standardization and Certification System, which will create a viable structure for certifying products (hardware and software) for use in the cyber sector. ComDCiber is also working to establish a Cyber Defense Observatory and Cyber Defense Talent Management to incentivize research and development in Brazilian technology. The partnerships established by the Ministry of Defense and the Army Command are another method used by ComDCiber to update its staff’s technical knowledge. “Our service members attend courses, expos, and international exercises that allow them to gain expertise on directing exercises like these in Brazil,” stated the command in a press release. The unit will be organizing the Second International Cyber Defense Internship in May. In addition to the Brazilian public, representatives from various partner nations, including Latin American countries, will also be taking part in this event. Integration among the Armed Forces ComDCiber’s major distinction is its potential to integrate the three branches of the Armed Forces. The unit, under the command of Lieutenant General Angelo Kawakami Okamura, has a Joint Chiefs of Staff directed by a rear admiral, a Department of Management and Instruction led by a major general, and a Cyber Defense Center (CDCiber, per its Portuguese acronym) led by a major general. According to information from EB, the synergy between the forces allows for joint improvement. “The budgeting of human and financial resources, experiential exchanges, and procedural standardization, as well as the compartmentalization of information on cyber threats and security events, strengthen our defense institutions,” the EB reported in a press release. Navy and Air Force line officers assumed their duties on April 25th. That was the first time in the history of the Brazilian Armed Forces that line officers had taken on a role in another service branch. Brazilian Navy Rear Admiral Nelson Nunes da Rosa assumed the lead role of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Brazilian Air Force (FAB, per its Portuguese acronym) Major General Mauro Fernando Costa Marra took the position of head of the Department of Management and Instruction. Command of the Cyber Defense Center will pass to Major General Jayme Otávio Queiroz on May 22nd. His new role will be challenging due to the degree of importance that cyber defense has achieved within the National Defense Strategy. “We are living in an increasingly connected environment. Cyber threats are real and can cause damage remotely. We need to always be ready,” Maj. Gen. Jayme said. In addition to the joint work done at ComDCiber, each service branch has its own teams, or Network Incident Response Centers (CTIR, per their Portuguese acronym), as set forth by the Brazilian Security Incident Research and Response Center. Colonel Robson Luís Lopes dos Santos, head of the Aeronautics Computation Center in Brasília (CCA-BR, per its Portuguese acronym), is responsible for coordinating one of these centers. He explained that there is a relationship of technical cooperation formally established between CCA-BR and ComDCiber. “Incidents detected by a CTIR or a FAB unit are shared with ComDCiber,” he said. For Col. Robson, ComDCiber has fostered cooperation between the Brazilian Armed Forces and the Ministry of Defense in the handling of issues related to areas of interest in cyberspace. “The involvement of CCA-BR technicians in working groups coordinated by ComDCiber is important for establishing a shared knowledge base,” he highlighted. Cyber protection in aviation According to Col. Robson, in addition to the incident response, CCA-BR also does cyber defense within the Aviation Command (COMAER, per its Portuguese acronym) for the purpose of raising cyber situational awareness on critical Information Technology assets such as systems and hardware, for example. CCA-BR technicians monitor incidents from the standpoint of network anomaly detection using selective triage. They analyze incidents, attempting to identify the origin and the vulnerabilities associated with them, and they are able to take actions to resolve the problem detected. “Active defense is also done using measures to prevent malicious activities in cyberspace,” the head of CCA-BR said. The work done by CCA-BR prevents events in cyberspace, which could potentially be harmful to COMAER, from occurring. “Currently, threats in cyberspace can have serious consequences for the operational and administrative capabilities of this institution,” Col. Robson warned. He explained that one effective defense measure has a direct impact on maintaining the FAB’s operational capacity to carry out its mission. “Without this measure, the Air Force’s resources would be left completely exposed to cyber threats.” For the head of CCA-BR, the evolution of cyber threats requires continually upgrading equipment and retraining technicians involved in cyber defense. “The great challenge is keeping up awareness, across all of COMAER’s units, as to its responsibility in applying preventive and defensive measures,” Col. Robson concluded.last_img read more

The QLD suburbs where house prices outperform in a downturn

first_imgBrisbane’s recession-proof suburbs have been revealed. Picture: Darren England.BRISBANE’S recession-proof suburbs have been revealed, with some of the city’s most overlooked middle and outer areas poised to lead a housing market recovery in the wake of COVID-19.Suburbs such as Macgregor, Mount Gravatt East and Moorooka could rebound faster from the present downturn than the traditionally bulletproof blue-chip suburbs.Data provided by CoreLogic showed the performance of capital city and regional housing markets three years after the global financial crisis (GFC) and identified the suburbs that outperformed despite the economic shock.This house at 153 Splendour Rd, Rochedale, is for sale. Rochedale home values rose 14 per cent post-GFC.Property Investment Professionals of Australia chairman Peter Koulizos said the best-performing suburbs post-GFC in Brisbane were mostly located in outer suburbs.Home values in Rochedale, 17km southeast of Brisbane’s CBD, rose more than 14 per cent in the three years between December 2008 and December 2011 — the best performing housing market in the city post-GFC.The housing market in the neighbouring suburb of Macgregor was also resilient during the period, with home values rising more than 9 per cent at the end of 2011.Interestingly, home values in the south Brisbane suburb are also tipped to recover strongly from the COVID crisis.This house at 500 Mains Rd, Macgregor, is for sale. Home values in Macgregor rose 9 per cent post-GFC.Alderley, 7km north of Brisbane’s CBD, was an exception to the outer suburb trend, recording a 9 per cent rise in median house prices during the downturn.Mr Koulizos said the suburbs likely to recover fastest from the current downturn were likely to be middle-ring suburbs that offered more affordable property prices than their inner-city counterparts, but with a similar standard of facilities.Those suburbs could include Kenmore, Macgregor, Moorooka, Mount Gravatt East and Stafford, he said.This house at 70 Mornington St, Alderley, is for sale. Alderley home values rose 9 per cent post-GFC.“Across Greater Brisbane, with the potential increase in people who work from home, the outer regions will also be on the radar of buyers and investors,” he said.“This will partly be due to affordability considerations, but also lifestyle factors such as being closer to the water in the Redcliffe or Redlands regions or the chance to live on acreage in parts of Logan or Ipswich.“The Gold and Sunshine coasts are also set to strengthen from local and interstate buyers who decide to prioritise lifestyle and opt to make a sea or tree-change sooner rather than later.”This house at 6 Robinson Rd, Moorooka, has just gone under contract.But Mr Koulizos said it was “impossible” to forecast exactly which suburbs would fare better than others post-pandemic.“It’s vital to always consider the underlying fundamentals of a location when investing in property for the long-term, such as infrastructure and access to schools and amenities,” he said.CoreLogic head of research Tim Lawless also believes suburbs within Brisbane’s middle and outer ring, at the lower end of the price spectrum, are likely to rebound the strongest after the pandemic — particularly those close to main arterial roads and train stations.This house at 19 Shannan Plc, Kenmore, just sold for $1.9 million.Mr Lawless said transport options in a suburb was often a driver of stronger capital gains.“As a legacy of COVID, it may be the case that more people are seeking lower-density housing options,” Mr Lawless said.“Many of the areas with a relatively affordable price tag are located further from the city where transport into the city centre may take some time, although commuting times may be less of a priority if there is lasting willingness from employers to allow staff to work remotely.”This five-bedroom house at 90 Carrara St, Mt Gravatt East, is for sale. Mt Gravatt East has been tipped to bounce back from the current recession.Mr Lawless said Queensland’s housing market recovery post-COVID would be slightly different to the GFC.“After the GFC, interest rates were coming down from higher levels, but we can’t do that now, so we won’t see the stimulating factor of interest rates falling because they are already super low,” he said.“The economy at the time was also benefiting from the mining boom. There was strong demand from China for resources and that had a substantial postive impact on regional Queensland in particular.“Where the similarity is much more appropriate is that it was a time when there was a lot of stimulus in the market, particularly for first-home buyers, and that’s something we should expect going forward.”CoreLogic head of research Tim Lawless.Mr Lawless said it was likely more housing incentives would be announced in the upcoming federal budget, which would apply to newly constructed homes and first-home buyers.“With that in mind, areas that will probably show a better performance coming in to next year are those popular with first-home buyers and those benefiting from people looking to build new properties,” he said.The best Queensland regional performer in the wake of the GFC was Moranbah, which recorded a 33 per cent surge in home values between December 2008 and December 2011.“Areas such as mining towns, where economic conditions are dependent on a single industry, are much more likely to experience bursts of price rises or falls because of the strength or weakness of their dominant industries,” Mr Lawless said.“While many of these mining regions recorded spectacular capital gains post-GFC, a few years later many of these same regions recorded a crash in home values.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus8 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market8 hours agoFIVE BRISBANE SUBURBS SET TO LEAD THE RECOVERY POST COVID-19Suburb Median home valueKenmore $731,648Macgregor $764,910Moorooka $671,281Mount Gravatt East $666,321Stafford $643,843(Source: PIPA/CoreLogic)BRISBANE’S TOP 5 RECESSION-PROOF SUBURBS POST-GFCSuburb % change in home values Dec 2008 to Dec 2011 Dec 2011 Median ValueRochedale 14.1% $1,006,729Macgregor 9.4% $521,145Alderley 9.2% $528,021Shorncliffe 8.8% $589,049McDowall 8.5% $543,464(Source: CoreLogic)last_img read more