Raiders’ Abram fined $28,075 for unnecessary roughness vs. Denver

first_imgALAMEDA — Johnathan Abram awoke to the news following season-ending shoulder surgery he would be fined $28,075 for unnecessary roughness stemming from a hit in the Raiders’ Week 1 win over the Denver Broncos.The NFL confirmed the fine Saturday, originally reported by the NFL Network, which said Abram plans to appeal.Abram received one penalty during the game, a 14-yard foul for lowering the head to initiate contact against running back Royce Freeman in the third quarter. It was the same …last_img

The Fruits of Two Worldviews

first_imgOf all the arenas of state-sponsored genocides of the 20th century, the Killing Fields of Cambodia were among the most disturbing.  There, in a massive social engineering project, a radical communist government systematically starved, tortured and murdered nearly two million people with the brutal efficiency of an assembly line operation.  The regime outlawed all religions.  It sought to establish a communist utopia by force, driving everyone into an instant agrarian economy, and eliminating the brightest and most skilled simply because they did not fit the communist ideal.  Simply wearing glasses was enough to be processed – i.e., photographed, catalogued, tortured if necessary, and shot or hacked in the back of the head with a hoe.  Hundreds of thousands were killed by their own countrymen in a cold, calculated operation so dispassionately merciless, Cambodians to this day are almost in denial of what happened.    The Independent reported that Kang Kek lew, otherwise known as Comrade Duch, was taken to the killing fields as part of his trial.  Duch had overseen Prison S-21 where 20,000 people were photographed, tortured and eliminated.  Now 66 years old, Duch broke down when shown trees where children’s heads were smashed and saw a pile of 8,000 skulls of victims.  The article says he “fell to his knees, hands clasped in tearful prayer for the terrible crimes committed three decades ago.”    Prayer?  Yes; you see, long after the fall of the Khmer Rouge, after some personal tragedies, he started attending a Christian church and became a born-again Christian in 1995.  He became a lay pastor.  When he went to assist the World Vision international relief organization in 1999, he was discovered by a journalist and surrendered to authorities.    A visit to the killing fields was part of his trial which resumed last July after eight years in detention without being charged.  It was also part of an effort to document the horrors of the regime in order to bring closure to the horrific tragedy that killed nearly a third of the Cambodian population.  Duch is one of five remaining leaders of the Khmer Rouge awaiting trial and sentencing by the UN-backed Cambodia Tribunal. Is this entry off-topic?  Perhaps somewhat.  But it is necessary to remember intently and frequently the stakes in the battle of worldviews.  Let’s recite the obligatory disclaimers first: not all atheists are genocidal maniacs, and not all Christians are merciful saints.  Understood.      That being the case, who can deny that the worst genocidal regimes in history were atheistic, and that most atheists are evolutionists?  Communist philosophy was built on atheism, and evolution was the scientific justification for its views.  Evolution portrayed a world of death and struggle where killing was necessary for the advancement of the race.  The fitness of the State, not the individual, is what mattered to both communists and national socialists (both, despite their differences, subsets of Social Darwinist ideology; see 02/17/2008 and 11/30/2005; also see response to criticism of this linkage by Dr. Richard Weikart on Evolution News).    Keeping unfit individuals around, in the minds of many Social Darwinists, was sin; advancing the fitness of the State was righteousness.  These were ideas first, then ideologies, then political parties, then dictatorships.  The perpetrators of communist genocides (Mao, Stalin, Pol Pot, and more) sincerely believed they were acting in accordance with the “laws of science” Darwin had delineated.    Here we see one perpetrator who underwent a radical change of worldview.  Kang Kek lew was no peasant yanked into service.  He had been head of a local college.  He joined the communist party of Cambodia willingly.  As a communist, Comrade Duch dutifully carried out the will of the State.  He even went beyond the call of “duty.”  The Wikipedia entry on him says,Assisted by his two deputies, Comrade Chan and Comrade Pon, Duch began perfecting his interrogation techniques and the purging of perceived enemies from the Khmer Rouge ranks.  Prisoners at these camps, mostly from the ranks of the Khmer Rouge, were routinely starved and tortured to extract real and made up confessions.  Few prisoners left the camps alive.Now with a Christian worldview, Duch weeps over his sins.  He prays for the souls of his victims.  As a lay pastor, he tried to teach others the truth.  He joined a Christian relief organization that works around the world to feed the hungry and bring relief to the vulnerable.  Only God knows the depths of his sincerity, but one thing is certain: a Christian worldview of mercy and compassion is polar opposite to the communist worldview that turned intellectuals into cold-blooded mass murderers.    Does Comrade Duch deserve the ultimate sentence for past crimes now that he has changed?  Whatever the tribunal decides, the blood of his victims is crying from the ground for justice.  The institutions of law enforcement, ordained by God according to the Apostle Paul (Romans 13), must act impartially by the rule of law and must weigh the magnitude of the crimes.  God will take care of justice for the soul.  These matters are not the point of this entry.  Comrade Duch’s story illustrates the stark contrast in the outcomes of worldviews that begin with intellectual questions – the existence of God, purpose in life, the nature of good and evil.    What begins in the mind can move armies: armies of tanks and bombs, or armies of relief workers.  That’s why Creation-Evolution Headlines matters.  The killing fields in Cambodia, chilling as they were, were not unique.  Each Social-Darwinist utopian regime committed similar atrocities in ways just as cold and calculated.  The body count from 20th-century state-sponsored genocides, far outstripping the number of casualties from war, is exhausting to contemplate (11/30/2005).  A proverb of Jesus, applied to science by Sir Francis Bacon, sums up in seven words what we tried to say in seven paragraphs: “By their fruits you will know them” (Matthew 7:15-20).(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

740 MW Solar Project Canceled in Nevada

first_imgA $5 billion solar project in Nevada with a planned capacity of 740 megawatts has been shelved because there were no buyers for the electricity, a California public television station reports.KCET said the ENN Mojave Energy project was to have been built on 9,000 acres of county land near Laughlin, Nevada, which is near the California state line. When the plant was proposed in 2011, backers assumed that California utilities under pressure of a renewable energy law would be eager to buy the electricity.But it turned out utilities could meet their obligations with in-state power, and despite “heated demands” by Nevada Sen. Harry Reid, Nevada’s largest utility didn’t want the power, either, because it had already met its renewable energy goal.With no willing buyers, the deal collapsed. In addition to the solar power station, the project would have included a million-square-foot solar panel factory, KCET said.last_img read more

India vs England: 5 things to know about 2nd Test at Lord’s

first_imgThe Anderson-Jadeja row has added more spice to the 2nd Test at Lord’sA lifeless pitch at Trent Bridge ensured the first test between England and India was drawn, despite some remarkable individual performances.The teams have only three days off to prepare for the second test at Lord’s on Thursday.To end its first streak in 21 years of nine straight tests without a win, England has recalled left-arm spinner Simon Kerrigan, less than a year after a nightmare debut in the Ashes at The Oval. England has played three tests this summer without a specialist spinner and drawn two and lost one to Sri Lanka. Kerrigan says, if he’s picked, the Ashes experience will weigh on him, but he’s a better player for it.Lord’s is normally a seamers’ track, and India has won only once there (1986) in 16 tests, but both sides were also expecting an England-friendly pitch at Nottingham.Here are five things to know ahead of the second test:ANOTHER SLOW PITCH: Trent Bridge groundsman Steve Birks apologized before the first test for preparing a flat pitch, but that was partly to help Nottingham recoup expenses by trying to ensure the test lasted five days. Lord’s counterpart Mick Hunt had some big-shot visitors on Tuesday, including England captain Alastair Cook, coach Peter Moores, managing director Paul Downton and board pitch consultant Chris Wood. None made a public statement about the conditions, but England batsmen Sam Robson and Gary Ballance were hoping for, more than expecting, a lively track.advertisementEngland seamers James Anderson and Stuart Broad bowled 113 overs at Trent Bridge, and won’t be excited if Lord’s is also placid. Anderson and Cook warned the fast bowlers won’t be able to endure all five tests of the series if they aren’t given pitches with more seam and bounce. “We need to have a contingency plan,” Cook says. “We just need a pitch with a bit of life in it. Lord’s looked green two days before the start, but its condition on Thursday morning will be what counts. It looked the same two days before the first Sri Lanka test in June.”COOK STILL SEARCHING FOR RUNS: Cook’s batting performances have been as lifeless as the Trent Bridge track. He was out for 5 in the first test, and spared from batting again by India batting out the fifth day to confirm a draw. That pressure hasn’t decreased, as his average this year has dropped to less than 14, with a top score of 28. In that department, he was showed up by the tailenders. Last-man Anderson hit his highest test score of 81, and India’s No. 9 Bhuvneshwar Kumar rattled off two half centuries. Meanwhile, his captaincy decisions were better, but each side was always going to struggle to bowl out the other twice.PRESSURE STILL ON DHONI: Mahendra Singh Dhoni did not have the best of tests as India captain at Trent Bridge. He ran himself out on 82 in the first innings and ran out of ideas during Joe Root’s and Anderson’s record 10th-wicket partnership of 198. His bowlers continually bowled short to Anderson, despite the pitch keeping the ball low. His fielding setup often allowed Root a single to retain the strike. Both of those errors allowed England back into the game and took the impetus away from India, a mistake he won’t want to repeat at Lord’s.BROAD AND ANDERSON KEY: Broad and Anderson bowled almost 60 overs each at Trent Bridge. Their importance to Cook and England cannot be understated, and the state of the pitch will determine how badly the England captain needs to use them. The effect of pitches that neutralize them, and a test series crammed within 42 days, means Cook is under an extra burden to manage his strike force. Broad is also managing a knee injury that ruled him out of the one-day internationals against Sri Lanka.KOHLI OFF FORM: Virat Kohli was identified as India’s dangerman ahead of the first test. The 25-year-old averages 44 from 25 tests but could manage only nine runs across two innings on a surface made for batting at Trent Bridge. Broad dismissed him both times, and Kohli will be wary of that developing into a trend.last_img read more