New positions announced at Church Mission Society

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Posted Apr 8, 2014 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Church Mission Society press release] The Church Mission Society (CMS) has this week announced the appointment of Debbie James to the new position of director of church and community mission. Debbie will take the lead in sharing CMS’s mission experience with churches in the UK, as well as encouraging members of the CMS mission community.Debbie says “CMS’s 215 years of mission experience is a great resource for the church in Britain today. We are committed to building relationships with churches, small missional communities and houses of mission, and to bringing our distinct contribution in pioneering, cross-cultural mission that is shaped by a global perspective.”“We want to connect, fuel and resource people to live out a transforming faith in their communities and churches.”Debbie, formerly a teacher in Moscow and the UK, joined CMS in 2001 as Encounter Teams coordinator, developing short-term mission team experiences and leading visits in Africa, Asia and Europe. Most recently she has been discipleship team leader, continuing to supervise short term teams as well as teaching on cross-cultural mission and developing discipleship materials such as CMS’s new course ‘The Possible World‘. Debbie has long been involved in pioneering youth work and is an active member of her local parish church, including ‘Messy Church’ on an estate.‘The Possible World’ course is a mission-shaped discipleship resource for church small groups. It encourages mature Christian engagement with issues such as the environment, materialism and justice. Complete with DVD and comprehensive Bible notes, the seven-week course creatively demonstrates how a different world is possible through the stories of some ordinary people doing amazing things inspired by the life of Christ.Debbie joins other recent appointments Jim Barker, who last week took up his post as director of fundraising for mission, and Jonny Baker, who began his new role as director of mission education in January.Jim, formerly responsible for donor recruitment at Oxfam and direct marketing manager for Friends of the Earth, was one of the original trainees at Oxford Youth Works. For the last 10 years he has worked in organisational planning and development with Levelheaded and as a self-employed, independent consultant.Philip Mounstephen, Executive Leader of CMS, said of these new appointments, “We’re delighted to be able to add such talent to our Senior Management Team. We are looking forward to them bringing new perspectives and ideas as CMS continues to develop high quality resources to equip the church for mission, as well as to grow and fuel our dispersed community as they share the love of Christ wherever they are in the world.”Debbie, Jim and Jonny join existing directors Henry Scriven, Paul Thaxter and Adrian White, who together with Philip Mounstephen, make up CMS’s senior management team Rector Shreveport, LA New positions announced at Church Mission Society AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Four chosen as nominees for 27th presiding bishop

first_img May 1, 2015 at 2:25 pm Wonderful. Gene Hawkins says: May 6, 2015 at 11:12 pm I have had the pleasure of growing up with Michael Curry under his dad Kenneth Curry in old St. Phillip’s Buffalo and now I serve with Ian Douglas in Connecticut. Let us fast and pray over the next coming weeks that we may serve Christ, presenting ourselves, our souls and bodies for the mission of God on earth. [Episcopal News Service] The Joint Nominating Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop May 1 announced the names of the bishops it will nominate this summer to succeed Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori.The four names will be formally submitted to the General Convention during a joint session on June 26, the day prior to the day set for the election by the House of Bishops of the 27th presiding bishop. The nominees are:The Rt. Rev. Thomas Breidenthal, 64, Diocese of Southern OhioThe Rt. Rev. Michael Curry, 62, Diocese of North CarolinaThe Rt. Rev. Ian Douglas, 56, Diocese of ConnecticutThe Rt. Rev. Dabney Smith, 61, Diocese of Southwest FloridaThe committee’s formal announcement, along with biographical information about each nominee, is posted on the General Convention website here in English, Spanish and French.Breidenthal was dean of religious life and of the chapel at Princeton University in New Jersey when he was elected on Nov. 11, 2006, to be the ninth bishop of Southern Ohio. He was ordained and consecrated April 28, 2007. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1974 from Portland State University, a Master of Arts degree from the University of Victoria, in British Columbia, in 1977, a Master of Divinity degree in 1981 from Church Divinity School of the Pacific and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in theology from Oxford University in 1991.Curry was the rector of St. James’ Episcopal Church, Baltimore, Maryland, when he was elected on February 11, 2000, to be the 11th bishop of North Carolina. He was ordained and consecrated on June 17, 2000. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from Hobart and William Smith College, in Geneva, New York, and a Master of Divinity degree in 1978 from the Berkeley Divinity School at Yale.Douglas was the Angus Dun Professor of Mission and World Christianity at Episcopal Divinity School when he was elected on Oct. 24, 2009, to be the 15th bishop of Connecticut. He was ordained and consecrated on April 17, 2010. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1980 from Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont, and a Masters of Education in counseling and consulting psychology from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1982. Douglas earned a Master of Divinity degree from Harvard Divinity School in 1983. In 1993, he earned a Doctor of Philosophy degree in religious studies from Boston University.Smith was rector of Trinity Church, New Orleans, Louisiana, when he was elected on Dec. 9, 2006, to be the fifth bishop of Southwest Florida. He was ordained and consecrated on Sept. 15, 2007. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting production from the University of South Florida in Tampa in 1980, a Master of Divinity in 1987 from Nashotah House and a Doctor of Ministry from Seabury-Western Theological Seminary with special focus on congregational development in 1999.The announcement of the nominees now opens a 12-day process to be followed by any bishop or deputy who wants to nominate from the floor a bishop not on the committee’s slate. The committee recently outlined the process that must be followed before any additional bishop may be nominated in that manner.Jefferts Schori and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings recently wrote to their houses with information about the bishops’ election and deputies’ confirmation process that will be followed at convention. That information is here.All of the nominees will be given the opportunity to address both houses of General Convention the afternoon of June  24. Their names will be formally submitted to the General Convention during a joint session of the two houses on June 26. Nominations from the floor, done according to the committee’s process, will happen during that session as well.Bishops will gather at the Convention Eucharist at 9:30 a.m. on June 27 in the Salt Palace Convention Center. Following that, the bishops with seat, voice, and vote will board buses to travel to St. Mark’s Cathedral, where the election will take place in the context of prayer and reflection.Once the election has taken place, Jefferts Schori will send a delegation to Jennings to inform her of the name of the bishop who has been elected. Jennings will refer the name to the House of Deputies legislative committee on the Confirmation of the Presiding Bishop without announcing the name to the full House. The legislative committee will make a recommendation to the House of Deputies whether to confirm the election or not confirm, and the House of Deputies will immediately vote on the recommendation. Jennings will then appoint a delegation of deputies to notify the House of Bishops of the action taken.“No communication is permitted from the House of Bishops during the election and until confirmation is received. I know this will be a challenge, but ask your cooperation and faithfulness to our mutual life and accountability,” Jefferts Schori said in her letter to the bishops.The presiding bishop-elect will preach at the convention’s closing Eucharist on July 3, and Jefferts Schori will preside. The presiding bishop-elect’s nine-year term officially begins Nov. 1, 2015.The presiding bishop is primate and chief pastor of the church, chair of the Executive Council, and president of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society.The 78th General Convention meets June 25 – July 3, in Salt Lake City, Utah. General Convention, Comments (33) Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Rev. Tom Buechele says: Richard McClellan says: May 5, 2015 at 9:26 am Dear Pat Trytten, “Old, male institution” has absolutely nothing to do with Bishop Curry. I wish most 30 year olds had half of his energy, drive, and ability to get across the love of Christ to others. He is about serving God by actively helping all of God’s children, from migrant farm workers to inner city dwellers to all of those who live and work in North Carolina and far beyond. Our diocese has been blessed and spiritually enriched to have him. R.L. Cherry says: General Convention 2015, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 May 5, 2015 at 3:52 pm Any of the four Bishops nominated would be well qualified for the job. We need to pray for the guidance of the Holy Spirit in the selection of our next leader. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Kathy Snow says: Four chosen as nominees for 27th presiding bishop Election will take place June 27 during General Convention in Salt Lake City AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Richard McClellan says: Rector Bath, NC May 2, 2015 at 10:02 pm Dear Judith, Were any women bishops willing to run? From what I have heard the answer is NO. June 17, 2015 at 7:52 pm I nominated him, so it was either his choice not to stand or the committee’s not to have him. He is, indeed, a great choice. Also, young so …. 2024? House of Bishops, May 3, 2015 at 2:21 am It is a great news. We together pray that the spirit will guide these great men of GOD Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Elections, May 2, 2015 at 8:58 am Hard to believe that Bishop Greg Rickel from the Diocese of Olympia did not make the list. He is progressive, organizationally minded, and inspiring. I was truly looking forward to learning about the vision he had in leading the Episcopal Church for the next nine years. Our loss not having him in the mix. Martha Richards says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Channing Smith says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York May 7, 2015 at 2:17 am I too was disappointed when our Bishop Greg Rickel was deleted from those running for this office but when I saw Bishop Michael Curry’s name on the list my whole body chuckled. After hearing him speak and share his love at a Conference in Atlanta several years ago he captured my heart. He not only loves God….. he truly loves people, EVERYONE…. I mean, men & women, green & blue, poor & rich, small & large, animal, vegetable or mineral. The material he writes and presentations he gives truly pass along his love and care for others. Whoever it may be God bless us with the very best Presiding Bishop that is chosen to replace our wonderful Katharine Jefferts Schori. June 26, 2015 at 8:15 am Peace to all. I wish to thank and support the Rev j, Houston Matthews on his service and comment. You have given much and survived much and your statement should be peel from all of our bells. May God guide our church through this pivotal convention. May all leave with the gifts of the Spirit and bring home the wonder, awe and joy that we are given each day if we only look and accept the love that God so overwhelmingly gives. God bless the Bishops and Deputies as they cast their votes tomorrow. May they and the whole church be re-invigorated with the joy of the Holy Spirit. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 May 7, 2015 at 7:45 pm Indeed Pray that a “Man for all Reasons” will have the Compassion, Spiritual fortitude and Moral backbone to Speak Out Loudly for Truth to Power in our country and world corrupted and dominated with politics and wars–and our desperatly needing a humane/humanitarian world vision–not afraid to speak out loudly for justice and equal rights for all peoples — for the Palestinians now only two(2) percent Christian community remaining in the Holy Land where our Dear Lord Jesus Christ was born and buried, and now millions of refugees in the Middle East abandoned, with Palestinians constantly uprooted and regarded as collateral damage! Who is that man? Is he among these four? Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Rev. John Crist says: Pat LeNeave says: June 26, 2015 at 10:28 pm Amen to that! Carolyn sowa, says: May 2, 2015 at 4:48 pm no women in the final 4. There were female candidates earlier on, some of whom withdrew themselves from the process. The fact that all 4 remaining candidates are male doesn’t mean women were left out entirely. It may well be that the 4 candidates truly are the best options from the candidates the search committee considered. June 9, 2015 at 5:06 pm I am so going to miss Katharine Schori. When the church needed a Presiding Bishop with a backbone, Katharine arrived. It is to be hoped the next one has an equally firm backbone and an equally firm commitment to the Episcopal Church. In the face of the Windsor gang’s willingness to countenance the torture and brutality of some African dioceses; its willingness to exclude LGBT folk from full inclusion in the life of Episcopal Church, going backward would be a crime. Amy rose cecil says: May 2, 2015 at 5:07 pm No women? No one west of Ohio? No younger people? Back to the old, male institution. Shame on all of you! Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA May 1, 2015 at 7:52 pm 4 wonderful nominees. Our Bishop in Ohio is a great man. Breidenthal was dean of religious life and of the chapel at Princeton University in New Jersey when he was elected on Nov. 11, 2006, to be the ninth bishop of Southern Ohio. He was ordained and consecrated April 28, 2007. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1974 from Portland State University, a Master of Arts degree from the University of Victoria, in British Columbia, in 1977, a Master of Divinity degree in 1981 from Church Divinity School of the Pacific and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in theology from Oxford University in 1991. Michael Chase says: June 26, 2015 at 8:15 am Thank you. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Erna Lund says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS May 6, 2015 at 4:00 pm Amen, Kathy!! He is the greatest thing since sliced bread for the office of Presiding Bishop. I adore him! Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ttus O. Olajide says: Wilma LaRae Neal says: Rector Collierville, TN Ronn Rucker, Ed. D says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA May 29, 2015 at 8:00 pm Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ, Having served the church for 37 years , I believe e we have four great candidates for PB. As wounded Vietnam Veteran, Priest, Father, and Grandfather, I have been given the grace to survive Vietnam, the Episcopal Church,and cancer. From Prayerbook changes, to the ordination of women, to the inclusion of those of different sexual ordination, we have survived. It is my prayer that we will move forward with love and the grace of a Dietrich Bonhoeffer in celebration of our Anglican Diversity and Anglican Comprehensiveness, so that we may select the PB to lead our weaken Church and to proclaim to the world that Jesus is still Lord of Lord and King of Kings. Pax Featured Events Pat Trytten says: June 6, 2015 at 8:41 pm I am in complete agreement with R I Cherry. We certainly do need a more tolerant PB in regards to conservative Episcopalians. Our present PB has shown through her statements and actions that she couldn’t care less about the concerns of conservative members of this church. I hope and pray that the these four candidates will consider all Episcopalians important to the church regardless of their social or political views and will communicate with conservative congregations rather than litigate. I just want a PB that will indicate loud and clear that in Christ there is no progressive and there is no conservative and that both groups are equally loved and equally important to this denomination. dallas baxter says: May 8, 2015 at 9:38 pm AMEN! Rev. Douglas James says: May 5, 2015 at 9:52 pm The joint nominating committee worked very hard and have selected 4 “men for all seasons”. I am impressed with their degrees and experience. I will add my voice however to some folks dismay that not only were no women put forth as nominees but no Latinos (as)-Hispanos (as) or Asians. The racial face of the USA is changing rapidly and in a short time the convergence of those diverse languages, cultures and spiritualities, largely embedded in USA poverty, must be integrated with a very old aging Episcopal anglo population. A great and challenging task. I pray the one “man for all seasons” elected will lead us into that diversity and inspire us in that direction.and call to justice. May 1, 2015 at 11:10 pm What ? No women nomimated ??? Really ! May 3, 2015 at 7:18 pm He has been a blessing to the diocese of NC. He is so wonderful and we need to prepare our hearts to share him with many others. Bless you Bishop Curry! Rector Martinsville, VA Comments are closed. May 15, 2015 at 5:13 pm Amen. Never met any of the candidates, but they all seem to be well qualified. A job well done by the nominating committee. Submit an Event Listing June 15, 2015 at 2:39 pm Agree – thanks. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY May 3, 2015 at 7:43 pm Recent experience in Maryland has taught that preferring diversity check-off points in preference to call and qualification is a mistake. We need to stop making chromosome counts and pigmentation into a litmus test for enlightenment. Male, female — how about the best of the called, willing, and able — no matter how many diversity points get checked off? Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Judith Hartmen says: Submit a Press Release John Andrews says: Rev. R.D.Meadows, Jr. says: The Rev. J.Houston Matthews says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Helen Anbell says: Rich Basta says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Josephine DiCalogero says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA May 24, 2015 at 11:47 pm To me, it is time for a tolerant PB, whoever that might be. By that I mean, let the liberal churches be liberal and let the conservative churches be conservative. If a church or diocese wants to leave the fold, let them go with a Christian wave of good-bye. Let us never be in the news as instigating a lawsuit. Money is not what our Faith is about. We need a Presiding Bishop, not a Pope. Josephine DiCalogero says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By ENS staffPosted May 1, 2015 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Doug Desper says: Terry Francis says: June 10, 2015 at 5:20 pm Complants against males, Caucasians, seniors, or not being from the right part of the country are just as troubling as those against women or minorities or those who are homosexual. Lets leave the pc to the secular and remember we are the body of Christ. All loving all inclusive.. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Diane Barker says: May 3, 2015 at 7:17 pm May the Holy Ghost guide all in the decision of the new bishop of TEC. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab May 1, 2015 at 7:30 pm From my view point as a lay person, the Joint Committee has chosen four good men to lead our church into the future. Praise God from whom all blessings flow………….. May 8, 2015 at 2:10 pm Time for a qualified man! Submit a Job Listing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Harriet Warnock-Graham says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME May 2, 2015 at 8:36 am I would be very sad to see Bishop Curry leave the diocese of NC. He has been a drivig force and a true inspirtion. His bookl “Crazy Christians” (a compilation of his convention addresses) should be enough evidence that he is the right person at this critical time in the live of our church. Hearing him speak is an experience not to be missed. It is hard for me to advocate for him to be PB because we would lose him from NC, but is fire and heart is exactly whatt we need. Walter C. Joyce says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

New coordinator for the International Anglican Family Network

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Anglican Communion, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books New coordinator for the International Anglican Family Network Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET People Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Anglican Communion News Service] The International Anglican Family Network has appointed a new co-ordinator, Deacon Angela Morrison, who will be taking over from Sally Thompson, recently retired from the role after a quarter of a century.Full article. Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Posted Feb 7, 2017 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

Gene Robinson named to two Chautauqua Institution posts

first_img Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rt. Rev. Gene Robinson is the former bishop diocesan of New Hampshire.[Chautauqua Institution press release] In anticipation of the departure of Director of Religion the Rev. Robert Franklin at the conclusion of the 2017 Chautauqua Institution season, President Michael E. Hill has announced plans to reorganize the Department of Religion with an eye toward shaping a national dialogue on faith in society.Retired Episcopal Bishop Gene Robinson, formerly of the Diocese of New Hampshire, will assume the new role of vice president and senior pastor of the Chautauqua Institution effective Sept. 1.  Robinson will provide executive leadership for the Department of Religion and will chair a new volunteer advisory group, the President’s Advisory Council on Faith in Society.Currently a fellow at the Center for American Progress,  Robinson is an internationally recognized interfaith leader. He is among the inaugural group of 13 senior fellows at Auburn Seminary, the first leadership development and research institute in the country to launch a fellowship program to cultivate the skills of multi-faith leaders working for justice. Also an outspoken advocate for the rights of marginalized populations,  Robinson is recognized for his groundbreaking work with the LGBT community, youth communities and those suffering from abuse and addiction.Longtime Associate Director of Religion Maureen Rovegno will be promoted to the role of director of religion, overseeing the day-to-day operations of the department and serving as a key programmatic partner to  Robinson.Robinson is no stranger to Chautauqua, having served as a popular and thought-provoking speaker/lecturer and as chaplain of the week during the 2011 season.“Religion is at the center of many of today’s most pressing issues and most difficult challenges,” Robinson said. “Yet in our increasingly polarized society, there are fewer safe places to have meaningful conversation about those challenges. Chautauqua and its Department of Religion have been, and will continue to be, a place where those conversations can happen, where all viewpoints are heard, and where every human being is honored and valued. Through the curated conversations from a religious perspective, our goal is no less than to heal the world.”Read the full release here. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC People Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Gene Robinson named to two Chautauqua Institution posts Retired bishop will become vice president/senior pastor, chair of President’s Advisory Council on Faith in Society Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Posted May 22, 2017 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

Liturgy and music group offers General Convention two ways to…

first_img Rector Albany, NY February 15, 2018 at 8:04 am First off, thanks for hard work. 2nd, while there is value and comfort in repeating the familiar, there must be a way to also have timely and dynamic prayers to share. We now have a school shooting roughly once a week. There are hurricanes and disasters and issues. How do we benefit from a Steven Charleston or all the ministry of the baptized in such moments? While not as immediate as I might like in this social media era, St. Louis University’s Sunday website is a good vehicle for delivering timely prayers: http://liturgy.slu.edu/ February 14, 2018 at 2:24 am I’m not certain if this is where I comment, however, I wish that there was a more transparent, hate to use that word, as it is too political now, but someone somewhere decides we need to have revisions to the BCP and The Hymnal 1982 – ?? Why? There is a reference above regarding better written liturgy for non-English speaking congregations, but can we be given any indication as to what the issues are with our present liturgy and our hymnal? I grew up with the 1928 version of the BCP, so the adaption of the 1979 revision was painful. Now that our BCP has a Rite I and a Rite II service which is rich in liturgy and theology, I have to ask why are we again revising it? And the 1982 revision of the 1940 hymnal has become revised, so why change it. If the changes are only additions to which would be more inclusive of the many, many nations around the world who are part of the Anglican Communion, then I have no problem with it – if that means we can still use our current editions of both BCP and Hymnal. However, if there are major changes in the liturgy, hymns, etc., which entails a complete change over to new material, then I am really not happy. We have only just within the last ten years purchased and are using the new RCL, and now perhaps we will need a new one along with a new Gospel Book, along with many copies of a new BCP and a new Hymnal – I don’t think our small churches can nor will support purchasing these items. This amounts to hundreds of dollars which we just don’t have. Through memorials and some generous gifts we were able to purchase copies of the WLP Hymnal Supplement, however, there is just so much small congregations can support. And when they are comfortable with and appreciate the liturgy they are using at this time, a few changes in words will most likely not convince them or the church administration to expend the dollars needed to purchase new books. I realize that the Episcopal Church is not a “congregational church” where the congregation has input into the elected decision-making body’s decisions- well perhaps indirectly. However, even though it might be a total nightmare, there should be some avenue for the layperson, especially one who is very involved in the service, its preparation and its delivery – I am a church organist in a small congregation and I prepare the weekly bulletin on my own with small input from our Rector. Our Rector has been with us for 7-8 years, and prior to her time of discernment and preparation for priesthood, was from another church denomination, so the tradition in our church falls onto me a lot of times just because she doesn’t know the history of the Episcopal Church and Communion. Also, at least 50% of our small congregation are “imports” from another denomination – mainly Roman Catholic, but still are not well versed in the traditions of the Episcopal/Anglican Communion. It grieves me that people such as I who have a long history of knowledge of the Episcopal Church, I am 74 years old, cannot have any input into the revisions of our beloved BCP and Hymnal. As I said, I am and have been a church organist since I was 16 years old – 58 years on the organ bench – honestly, do you not think that I have some knowledge of the liturgy and the hymns. (Perhaps more than some who are sitting on the committee to revise the BCP and Hymnal). When I started playing the organ our church, as many other Episcopal churches at that time, had Morning Prayer services on three Sundays and Holy Communion on the 4th Sunday. Our congregation sang with great gusto all of the canticles in Morning Pray as easily as if they were singing an old favorite hymn. In the early 1960’s our priest, who had a magnificent singing voice, decided we would have a sung Eucharist as well as Eucharist every Sunday. We proceeded to sing, from the 1940 hymnal, the “Fourth Communion Service” music, Plainsong. If you have a 1940 Hymnal, look it up, this music was not for wimps. We sang this music every Sunday. The next Rector used Morning Prayer as the first part of the service with the readings, psalms, etc., and we again sang/chanted, as a congregation, the “Te Deum Laudamus”, as easily as if we were singing the hymn “Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty”. Thus, the tradition in our small church and congregation is rich and full. We need to have some voice in a revision or some sort of “survey” or some other instrument to be able to make known our thoughts and fears about what the General Convention is proposing. I just don’t feel it is fair to any of us Episcopalians that we are spoon-fed this new revision because some committee decided it needed to happen. Perhaps each Diocese could submit a culmination of thoughts and ideas which they in turn have gathered from each Deanery, which would hopefully give each of their parishes a chance to voice their opinion. Perhaps many are not as passionate as I am about this, however, I am passionate about it. I would be happy to facilitate any of the above actions if this suggestion every became an actual action. Thank you for your consideration of my thoughts and concerns. Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Liturgy and music group offers General Convention two ways to approach the prayer book Both options are meant as invitation to churchwide discernment about its common prayer Submit a Job Listing February 14, 2018 at 1:31 pm I am excited that my church is taking on the difficult discernment about our liturgical language in prayers and hymns. Expansive language is just plain sensible. I am passionate about including language about the image of God in whatever revisions and options for the options the SCLM and GC present—as long as they include God x 3 in their deliberations. For centuries our God imagery has been dominantly transcendent, dominantly almighty, and exclusively masculine. Is it not time to create a just and loving language for humanity AND divinity? Whatever is decided will require, mandate, a lot of on-the-ground teaching, conversation, and advocating for adult formation options such as Education for Ministry. I’m proud of my church and its willingness to tackle tough controversial issues. As long as everyone comes away feeling a little uncomfortable with outcomes, we’ll be fine. Early biblical editors after all did canonize diversity and the tensions that go with it. So did Creator-God. Let’s follow. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC February 13, 2018 at 5:09 pm I personally favor Option 2, which will focus our attention on the current BCP and supplemental liturgies, to ensure that we understand where these prayers enrich us, and where we need to expand our outreach. Only then can we undertake the sensitive and prayerful revision of the BCP. I know that many, such as myself, who are only familiar with the 1979 BCP want to be careful in our approach to revision. We need to find where the current BCP “ain’t broke, so don’t fix it” and where we are called to augment our common prayer lives. Blessings to the Commission for their hard work. Kenneth Knapp says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Charlotte Weaver-Gelzer says: Pamela Payne says: February 14, 2018 at 12:16 pm In my view, the most compelling finding in the Standing Commission’s report is that we are not making anywhere near full use of the BCP as a resource for discipleship and evangelism. To quote the report: “The BCP 1979 offers a wonderful instrument for deepening the Christian formation and the devotional life of the people of God, and holds great potential as a means of evangelism. However, we have not broadly employed the Prayer Book for either of these purposes.” I have no problem with needed revisions, updates or inclusionary language. But if we’re going to invest the time and money, we should not allow the “new” BCP to gather dust in the increasingly empty pews of our churches. We need to make the BCP a daily companion on our own faith journeys, and take its rich prayers, liturgies and catechism into the world to those unaware of this wonderful resource. Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ mfschjonberg says: Tom Sramek, Jr. says: February 16, 2018 at 12:26 am Thank you for this thoughtful article! As someone who returned to the Episcopal Church as an adult (after meaningful forays into other of the world’s faith traditions), I have seen how the liturgy can be an impediment to newcomers who (in the words of my brother and wife) find themselves scrambling to keep up with the standing up and sitting down and kneeling, while going from the Order of Service to the insert and back again, and trying to sing hymns from a century ago or more, with unfamiliar melodies….” -resulting in an hour and a half of confusion rather than an encounter with Jesus. No matter how warm and welcoming people are at coffee hour, they don’t return. Yes, the BCP is indeed a rich resource for spiritual deepening, but it also doesn’t speak even to many of my generation who are delving deeply into writers like Cynthia Bourgeault, Henri Nouwen, Richard Rohr, etc., much less to millenials. It’s a difficult road, to be sure. I love the Episcopal Church; it’s my spiritual home, and I want to see it building bridges into a suffering world, reaching people *where they are*. To borrow a phrase from current psychology, we need to be a church that is “spiritually available” to people whose lives are often rushed, stressed, and over-committed, caught in over-consumption and divisive politics, and whose moral compass may have lost True North. Our prayers, hymns and liturgies must be part of bridge construction, building a sure path into the church. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Robert Olliges says: Submit an Event Listing February 13, 2018 at 5:54 pm Maybe one has to read the “Blue Book Report”, but it is unclear to me what we are trying to fix with a revision. Without a clear statement of the problem I don’t know how one can select an approach or evaluate the results. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Karen Morgan says: February 14, 2018 at 10:37 am The explanation given in this article feels like a pulled punch–from the top down. I am not at all sure calls for common prayer to ensconce the denomination in the “Jesus Movement” and the “Beloved Community” are heard by all who would then be using the revised prayer books and hymnals–much less understood or felt as needed by most people worshiping in TEC congregations. Perhaps part of the projected study periods could be accompanied by trials of small sections revised and put in strategic places in every diocese, along with the commitment to participate in evaluation exercises. Any study of this sort must cover a full year, so all seasons of the church year are experienced using the different liturgical options. I fully support review of liturgical resources, but I feel apprehensive about the approach of a compulsory change in which only some of the people who worship, have decisive influence on all the rest. February 13, 2018 at 5:48 pm It will be interesting to see how we develop a new, updated liturgy to reflect a new, updated church of the Jesus movement when we’re not sure that new, updated church looks like yet. Perhaps it might be the other way around: we create a new, updated liturgy/prayerbook and try to model our church after it? I’m not sure that will work. The Rev. Lyn G. Brakeman says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Sally Marciniak says: Rev. Tom Garrison says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ainslie Kincross says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ February 15, 2018 at 9:53 am Man, it’s the hymnal. Who decides the BCP needs updating? This summer’s meeting of General Convention is being invited to consider how it orders its common prayer and why.[Episcopal News Service] The prospect of revising the current Book of Common Prayer is filled with risk, complexity and “potentially great promise.”That is the gentle invitation the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music has put before the Episcopal Church five months before the start of the 79th General Convention.The church does not revise the prayer book lightly or frequently. The current book dates to 1979, which replaced the 1928 version. The General Convention asked in 1997 that the Standing Liturgical Commission, as it was then known, develop a comprehensive plan for prayer book revision. The group did so, and convention approved it in 2000 but failed to provide adequate funding. However, that effort resulted in the liturgical commission’s developing a series of supplemental liturgies known as “Enriching Our Worship.”In 2015, General Convention charged the liturgy and music committee with presenting to the upcoming July 5-13 gathering in Austin, Texas, a plan for a comprehensive revision of the Book of Common Prayer. After considering four different approaches, the SCLM is offering a comprehensive plan for revision, as requested, as well as a way for the church to spend time discerning the future shape of its common prayer. The SCLM has included “guiding assumptions,” work plans, suggested processes and tools, hundreds of pages of supplemental material and budgets for each approach.The approaches are described in a portion of the SCLM’s Blue Book report released to the church Feb. 13. The prayer book subcommittee’s report is here.All the information represents what the group explored and synthesized, the Rev. Devon Anderson, SCLM chair, told Episcopal News Service. It is being offered to General Convention as a resource to help guide the conversation on what should be done.The current edition of the Book of Common Prayer dates to 1979. It is the result of a long process of discernment and congregational use of various proposed liturgies. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe first option would move the church immediately into a full-blown prayer book revision process that would be complete in nine years. “As a church, we are engaging energetically in our presiding bishop’s call to assert our place in the Jesus Movement. We are turning outward to our neighborhoods, exploring new modes and ancient ways of being church, and rethinking our structures,” the commission says in its so-called Blue Book report. “This may well be a time when we are primed for change.”The commission added that it is important that the church be intentional about the direction of the change. Thus, it said, it is offering a second approach.That option calls on the church to plumb the depths of the current Book of Common Prayer’s theology, as well as its usefulness as a tool for unity in a diverse church, for evangelism and discipleship. “The more we thought about Option One, the more we focused on the essential need for the church to take stock of its devotion and commitment to common prayer, not only to be clear about why we have a Book of Common Prayer in the first place, but to embrace a common life that celebrates our unity in difference,” the report says.Anderson said that the SCLM “spent a lot of time making sure that Option Two wasn’t just the anti-prayer book revision option.”Instead, she said, it is meant to seize the attention of General Convention and suggest a way for the church “to have a real discernment about our common prayer” and about where God is calling the church to be now.“The whole point about everything we put out there [in the report] is to equip General Convention to have a unifying discernment about our common prayer and trying to elevate the debate above asserting our personal piety.”If convention agrees to the second approach, this would include new BCP translations. The commission says it is “generally recognized” that the current word-for-word Spanish and French translations are inadequate. Moreover, the book needs to be translated into Haitian Creole and many other languages, especially First Nations languages. The present state of BCP translation “belies our oft-stated desire to be fully inclusive” and can be solved by handing the task of translation to the communities most affected and giving them the resources they will need, the report says.The commission sees this work as part of the reconciliation to which Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has called for in Becoming Beloved Community: The Episcopal Church’s Long-Term Commitment to Racial Healing, Reconciliation, and Justice. “One concrete way to invest ‘in the flourishing of every person’ [as described in that document] is to offer the poetic beauty and depth of the Book of Common Prayer in the languages in which it is prayed,” the commission’s report says.For generations, Episcopalians have valued their personal copies of the Book of Common Prayer. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceFinally, the second option would include an expansion of the canonical categories for forms of authorized worship. While there is a provision for liturgies approved for trial use, there is no canonically supported or authorized category for liturgies beyond the Book of Common Prayer. “Yet, over the last two generations General Convention has created a confusing field of ‘supplemental’ liturgies with no canonical home,” the commission says, suggesting that remedying this situation would make for good order in the way the church approves and uses liturgies and would expand the range of liturgies that “could richly inform any future revision.”“Such an expansion would also be vastly less expensive and more efficient than the wholesale revision of the prayer book, not diverting precious funds from urgently needed mission,” the commission members say.The commission estimates that beginning comprehensive prayer book revision would cost $1.9 million in the 2019-21 triennium alone, and the entire revision process would cost between $7 and $8 million. The estimate for the second approach is $1.1 million for one triennium only, a price tag that includes the suggested translations project but not a formal prayer book revision process. The budgets in the SCLM’s report details what that money would cover.Anderson told ENS that the commission felt it owed the church “a very detailed budget analysis to accompany each of the two options.“To the extent possible we were exhaustive in parsing out every single step and resource at market rate to substantiate the price tags attached to the different approaches.”Anderson said she is proud of the work the commission accomplished, given its “huge mandate” that included much more than just the issue of prayer book revision. In addition, General Convention sent resolutions to the SCLM asking for a plan for revision of the Hymnal 1982, a complete revision of the Book of Occasional Services, a revision of the church’s calendar of saints, development of new prayers about racial reconciliation and pursuing efforts of the commission’s Congregational Song Task Force. Anderson estimated that convention sent SCLM upwards of $500,000 worth of projects.Despite the scope of that work, SCLM’s initial funding from convention allowed for only two face-to-face meetings in two years, and as many Adobe Connect video conferencing and teleconferences as it needed. Convention did not provide money for work on any of the projects it requested. The Executive Council gave the commission more money at midterm, and the group also found some additional small grants.The order of the Eucharistic liturgy in the Book of Common Prayer has changed over the years. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“Liturgy and the act of worship is, at its foundation, relational,” Anderson said. “While Adobe Connect and other online tools can be helpful, they are no replacement for the kind of team- and trust-building that happens in person.“While these tools are also cost-efficient, when we rely on them too heavily, what we sacrifice is the full inclusion of the church. Both prayer book options would require real relational engagement – visiting and listening where Episcopalians are gathered to pray. Spending time in the ‘natural habitats’ of Episcopalians everywhere, and developing relationships there, would allow either option to benefit from the experience, cultures, knowledge and poetry that live across the church.”Read more about itThe SCLM plans to post on its blog a series of essays about the various projects it worked on this triennium, and will host online discussions there. The lead-off posts on the prayer book report is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. February 14, 2018 at 1:58 am BCP ?? If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Rector Washington, DC February 14, 2018 at 12:22 pm A profound thank you to Mary Frances Schonberg for writing and presenting this most important article ASAP. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Kevin McGrane Sr. says: center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET February 13, 2018 at 10:26 pm I believe one of the biggest things we’re trying to update (not “fix” per se) is the lack of inclusive language in the current BCP. Even the “more inclusive” EOW is 20 years old! I routinely have members of my congregation using “she” to refer to the Holy Spirit and substituting “God” for “Lord” or “He” when referring to the first person of the Trinity. Why not have a prayer book, or at least some options, that reflect the way we actually pray rather than the way we prayed in the 1980s or 1990s? Prayer Book Revision Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET February 13, 2018 at 9:40 pm I know this is a bit off-topic, but I think a revised Hymnal might be more useful than a revised BCP. Let me change that a bit. It’s important that the BCP be meaningful to today’s churches, but much of the music in the Hymnal is more outdated than the services in the BCP are. However, I know there are some life-long Episcopalians who might not wish to lose what is familiar to them in both the Prayerbook and Hymnal. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group STANLEY ZIMMERMAN says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI General Convention, Rector Tampa, FL February 14, 2018 at 1:02 pm Sally Marciniak, stand by for the committee’s take on hymnal revision. General Convention asked it to consider that issue as well. Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Liturgy & Music, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Len Freeman says: February 17, 2018 at 5:55 pm My experience is that we are not using or living into the 1979 BCP much at all… and that we’re kind of been driven by a need to “do something different” without letting the words of the BCP and the faith shape us, rather than the other way around.We’d certainly kill a lot fewer trees if more congregations stopped churning out full copy bulletins each Sunday, and just used what is in the pews.My other experience, as a priest of 40+ years, and a communications scholar, is that too often the shifts are pushed by the experience of we who are ordained rather than the laity.In communications terms redundancy is in fact a major positive, especially for enculturating people into a coherent body. The laity, who often come once or twice a month, experience the liturgy very differently from we who two or three services every Sunday.We clergy get “bored”… want something “fresh” and “innovative” …while they are often wanting and looking for a recognizable pattern to respond to and feed them.“The primary impact of mass media is to reinforce and support people in things they already believe in” is what the literature says…..It strikes me that worship and the BCP are precisely mass media phenomena in these senses… and our worship a place to particularly “reinforce and support” our people in the things of the faith that they have come to believe in.Bottom line… take a breather….. and use the book, (or put it up on a screen in front, or on iPads.. if you really want to be “current.”) Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 13, 2018 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Keith Coppage says: mfschjonberg says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis February 15, 2018 at 1:52 am Let us consider that every church has a growing population of worshipers with dementia. In the later stages of this disease the person is non-verbal. However, if the Lord’s Prayer is recited there is both memory and voice! In earlier stages the old hymns and other parts of our liturgy produce the same wonderful responses in dementia sufferers. Let us also consider the the Book of Common Prayer in the Church of England was last revised in 1662. Perhaps there is an alternative way of thinking about this issue. General Convention 2018, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments (18) Bob Murray says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 14, 2018 at 12:53 pm George Price, you are welcome. George N Price says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

Diocese of Western Massachusetts holds its third annual Blessing of…

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Egan MillardPosted Feb 26, 2020 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Bishop’s Award recipient Wayne Phaneuf, left, receives a page from The North Star from Bishop Douglas Fisher at the third annual Blessing of Journalists at Christ Church Cathedral in Springfield, Massachusetts, on Feb. 25, 2020. Photo: Diocese of Western Massachusetts[Episcopal News Service] In a time when journalists are singled out as the “enemy of the people” by the president of the United States and subjected to an “unprecedented” level of violence and intimidation, the Diocese of Western Massachusetts has made it a point to honor them.The diocese held its third annual Blessing of Journalists at Christ Church Cathedral in Springfield on Feb. 25, a few days after The Episcopal Church’s annual commemoration of Frederick Douglass. The timing is intentional: Douglass, a former slave who became one of the leaders of the abolitionist movement, was a journalist himself, establishing the anti-slavery newspaper The North Star in 1847.The service included the presentation of the Bishop’s Award, which is given to a local journalist “who demonstrates excellence in bringing local and national concerns to the people of Western Massachusetts.” This year’s recipient was Wayne Phaneuf, who recently retired from his position as the executive editor of The Republican, Springfield’s daily newspaper. Phaneuf had worked for the paper since 1969.From left, Bishop Doug Fisher, Wayne Phaneuf, Springfield City Councilor Jesse Lederman and Dean Tom Callard of Christ Church Cathedral at the third annual Blessing of Journalists. Photo: Diocese of Western Massachusetts“It is a joy to award excellence in journalism, especially at a time when the profession is under attack,” said Bishop Douglas Fisher during the service, according to text of his remarks provided by the diocese. “It has never been more important, and The Episcopal Church cares. I am especially grateful to journalists who give the voice of faith a place in our public discourse. … Over the past 50 years, Wayne Phaneuf’s work has had a demonstrable impact on the life of our community.”Fisher presented Phaneuf with a framed page from The North Star, highlighting the connection to Frederick Douglass.This page from the abolitionist newspaper The North Star, published by Frederick Douglass, was presented to Wayne Phaneuf at the third annual Blessing of Journalists. Photo: Diocese of Western Massachusetts“Douglass understood the power of the free press to help our nation listen to its better angels,” Fisher said. “The Episcopal Church supports the work of journalists here and abroad as essential to our republic and to the work of peace and justice in our time.”The service included readings from Scripture as well as excerpts from the writings of Douglass, Thomas Jefferson, Pope Francis, the U.S. Constitution and other sources on the importance of a free press. In the prayers of the people, special intentions were offered for journalists working in dangerous environments, the White House press corps, and “those whose news has been labeled ‘fake’ and whose stories and reporting have been dismissed and belittled.”In his final blessing, Fisher adapted the Prayer for Journalists by St. Francis de Sales, patron saint of writers and journalists:“Strengthen and direct, we pray, the will of all whose work it is to write what many read, and to speak where many listen. May we be bold to confront evil and injustice. May we be understanding and compassionate of human weakness. May we reject the half-truth which deceives, and the slanted word which corrupts.”– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Diocese of Western Massachusetts holds its third annual Blessing of Journalists Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CAlast_img read more

Canadian Anglican bishops call for guaranteed basic income

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Posted May 4, 2020 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canadian Anglican bishops call for guaranteed basic income Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Faith & Politics Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Anglican Communion, Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Anglican Church of Canada] What follows is an open letter signed by 41 Anglican and ELCIC bishops to the prime minister, deputy prime minister and minister of finance of Canada, calling for a guaranteed basic income.Dear Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister Morneau:We write from across our country – from the tundra of the high Arctic, the out-ports of the Atlantic coast, from French- and English-speaking Canada, from urban to rural, the Prairies, the Rockies and coastal mountains and from the Pacific coast; we write as Indigenous people and as non-Indigenous. We write from across denominational traditions. As bishops of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada and the Anglican Church of Canada we write, compelled by our shared faith convictions and moral obligation to care for the human condition of all.Read the entire letter here. Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tagslast_img read more

Frozen turkey donations highlight Episcopalians’ efforts to fight food insecurity…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Food and Faith This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Southwick Community Episcopal Church in Southwick, Massachusetts, donated about 300 frozen turkeys this month to local organizations involved in feeding efforts in the region. Photo: Cheryl McCarthy[Episcopal News Service] The coronavirus pandemic has forced ministries across The Episcopal Church to adjust to public health precautions, but that wasn’t going to stop Southwick Community Episcopal Church from saying prayers over hundreds of frozen turkeys this month.“This has been such a tradition – we can’t just not pray over the turkeys,” said Cheryl McCarthy, senior warden at the Western Massachusetts congregation, which donated 310 frozen turkeys to community organizations to help furnish neighbors with a filling Thanksgiving dinner.The holiday tradition of giving is one shared by other Episcopal congregations around the country. “Usually the week before the Thanksgiving pantry is one of the most exciting weeks at St. Matthew’s,” the Rev. Kelly Kirby, rector at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Louisville, Kentucky, told Episcopal News Service. Instead of distributing frozen turkeys, this year the church gave away packages of turkey breasts and gift cards to more than 300 families.And in the Diocese of Atlanta, St. David’s Episcopal Church collected nearly 300 frozen turkeys to donate to the nearby North Fulton Community Charities in Roswell, Georgia. The annual campaign both feeds those in need and strengthens relationships within the parish and the community, said Judy Hine, who serves as the church’s director of children’s ministry and coordinates the frozen turkey drive.“I feel like God is working all things for good and will work to create new things when we reach out to one another,” she told ENS.Underlying Episcopal ministries like these is an understanding that too many Americans are suffering from food insecurity, especially during the pandemic and its resulting economic downturn. The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines food insecurity as temporary or long-term nutritional deficiency brought on by poor quality, variety or desirability of diet, as well as more severe cases involving reduced food intake.About 1 in 10 American households suffered from food insecurity before the pandemic, and of those, about a third were deemed severe cases. Northwestern University estimated in June that food insecurity surged to 23% of households nationwide in the months after the pandemic was declared in March.Volunteers on Nov. 21 distribute Thanksgiving fixings, including turkey breast packages, to about 300 people in a drive-up distribution event at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Charles Frank/St. Matthew’sThe demand for food at the pantry run by St. Matthew’s has remained steady this year, Kirby said. The Louisville congregation started its pantry 10 years ago, and “anyone who comes, we give food. We don’t ask questions.”Previously, neighbors who received food were asked to volunteer with the pantry, but during the pandemic, the ministry has limited its volunteer opportunities to adults and children connected to the parish. Instead of coming in and choosing the food they want, recipients now can pick up boxes, filled in advance, through a drive-up service once a month outside the church.The annual turkey distribution has “been a huge deal in the past,” Kirby said. Normally they have people waiting in the building while the food is distributed, filling the parish hall with conversation and good cheer, while someone plays holiday songs on the piano – a “spirit of togetherness” that wasn’t possible this year.Instead, a smaller-than-normal volunteer crew gathered outside Nov. 21 to distribute 279 turkey breast packages provided by the Louisville Food Bank, and when those ran out, families received $15 gift cards to help prepare Thanksgiving meals at home.Other than a few small worship services over the summer, “the parish has not been inside the building since March,” Kirby said. “The pantry continued on during the pandemic even when things were really shut down. I think it’s a source of joy for the congregation.”In addition to supporting feeding ministries in their communities, Episcopalians are encouraged to get involved with The Episcopal Church’s support for systemic solutions to the problem of hunger, including through pending federal legislation. In particular, the church’s Washington-based Office of Government Relations emphasizes the need to bolster the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps.“The Office of Government Relations recognizes and laments the food insecurity crisis faced by so many families as a result of the pandemic,” Rushad Thomas, a policy adviser with the Episcopal agency, said in an email. “We are advocating for a 15% increase in the maximum SNAP benefit in future COVID relief legislation, and we will continue to center the needs of food-insecure Americans, and particularly food-insecure children, in our conversations with federal lawmakers.”The Episcopal Church has stepped up its financial backing of local feeding ministries as well, notably through its latest round of United Thank Offering grants. Nine of the 26 UTO grants awarded in October were given to ministries taking a variety of approaches to fighting hunger in their communities.Episcopal clergy and lay leaders in some parts of the country also are helping to connect food producers who have unsold agricultural surplus with families in need of healthy food. The Diocese of Maine has served this year as a sort of intermediary between farmers and unemployed residents, with the help of federal COVID-19 relief money.And in Pacific Palisades, California, the Parish of St. Matthew issued a call for donations to support a new nonprofit called the FarmLink Project, founded by St. Matthew’s Parish School alums who were home from college earlier this year because of COVID-19. Their idea was to connect farmers directly to food banks, and their team has grown to include more than 100 college students across the country. An estimated 15 million pounds of food have been delivered.“In the midst of this pandemic, there is much to worry about and fear, and still much to be grateful for and hopeful about,” the Rev. Stefanie Wilson, assistant priest at the Parish of St. Matthew, said in a summer newsletter. “God’s infinite creativity is bubbling up as people right here band together to find local and global solutions to all kinds of problems.”Southwick Community Episcopal Church’s Thanksgiving ministry is nearly as old as the church, which was founded 16 years ago just southwest of Springfield, Massachusetts, near the Connecticut state line. The congregation started by collecting and distributing turkey dinners for the holiday. Seven years ago, a community organization that serves families in Southwick and two neighboring communities asked for help with whole turkey donations to go with the Thanksgiving side dishes it was offering its patrons.The Episcopal congregation shifted its efforts to collecting frozen turkeys. Parishioners bought the turkeys and dropped them off at the church, where they were arrayed on a tarp spread across the lawn. The congregation would bless the turkeys on the Sunday before Thanksgiving, and volunteers would form a line like a fire brigade to transfer the 300 turkeys to trucks for delivery to several other organizations in the area.This year, to reduce the amount of close contact on distribution day, organizers encouraged donations of money, which the church used to buy the turkeys. “This year we bought smaller turkeys, knowing that people wouldn’t be able to have large gatherings,” McCarthy, the senior warden, told ENS.They also spread distribution across two Sundays, Nov. 15 and 22, partly to reduce the number of volunteers needed. And rather than laying the turkeys out on the lawn, the frozen birds went right into the truck – to be prayed over and then delivered.Members of St. David’s Episcopal Church in Roswell, Georgia, pose in front the pickup truck they loaded with frozen turkeys Nov. 22 during the congregation’s annual pre-Thanksgiving frozen turkey drive. Photo: Judy HineThe frozen turkey drive at St. David’s in suburban Atlanta has a similar backstory. Seven years ago, the congregation was engaged in discernment: “What is our role? What can we do as a community for our neighbors?” said Hine, the children’s ministry director. Parishioners served a free Thanksgiving meal that year, but the following year, representatives from North Fulton Community Charities advised them of a greater need, to help families celebrate Thanksgiving at home.“What they said they needed was frozen turkeys,” Hine recalled. “At first, it didn’t really capture my imagination, but what was important was the people doing the work said, ‘This is what our families need.’”So for the past six years, St. David’s has rallied its parishioners and the community to contribute to its frozen turkey drive – one of several ways the congregation supports North Fulton Community Charities each year. Turkey drop-off days were Nov. 18-20, and the turkeys were loaded into a big freezer at the church.“Families literally pulled up, and in the back of their car there were a half-dozen turkeys rolling around in the back seat,” Hine said.Parishioners also could drop off turkeys in the morning on Nov. 22, if they were attending the outdoor Sunday worship service at the church. By noon, volunteers had loaded the last of the turkeys into the back of a pickup truck for delivery.“St. David’s is a very generous parish, and it gives us a way to express our gratitude in a tangible way,” Hine said of the ministry. “It’s that focus on coming together that can be hopeful and healing.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Servicecenter_img Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Public Policy Network, Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing By David PaulsenPosted Nov 23, 2020 Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Frozen turkey donations highlight Episcopalians’ efforts to fight food insecurity on Thanksgiving Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

New Congress still overwhelmingly Christian, heavily Protestant

first_img Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Congress still overwhelmingly Christian, heavily Protestant Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Religion News Service] The 117th session of Congress got off to a testy start on Jan. 3, including an opening prayer from an ordained member whose pairing of “A-woman” with the traditional “Amen” raised both hackles and questions about the meaning of the word. But what is rarely at question is the religious composition of Congress, as the House and Senate remained overwhelmingly Christian (88%), and heavily Protestant (55%), the Pew Research Center has found.A total of 294 House and Senate members are Protestant Christians, out of a possible 535 — nearly the same as the last Congress. Like the previous Congress, too, the 117th Congress is also unlike America as a whole when it comes to faith allegiances.Pew Research Center found that 26 members of the new Congress identified as Anglican or Episcopalian. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceWhereas about a quarter (26%) of U.S. adults are religiously unaffiliated — describing themselves as atheist, agnostic or having no particular religion — Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, a Democrat from Arizona, was the only member of Congress to identify as religiously unaffiliated. Rep. Jared Huffman, a California Democrat, describes himself as a humanist. Both Sinema and Huffman have said they do not consider themselves atheists.Eighteen others declined to specify a religious affiliation.“Is it disappointing that there’s this much underrepresentation of non-religious voices in Congress?” asked Hemant Mehta, an atheist writer and podcaster. “Yes. It’s deeply depressing.”But he noted he was encouraged that four of the 18 who declined to specify a religious affiliation are part of the Congressional Freethought Caucus, a group established in April 2018 to foster science and reason.Pew found a growing number of congressional members do not identify with a particular denomination, such as Methodist, Lutheran or Presbyterian. There were 96 members of Congress who said they were simply Christian or Protestant. By contrast, in 2009, during the 111th Congress, only 39 members described themselves this way.The Pew analysis relied on CQ Roll Call data on the religious affiliations of members of Congress.It found that several religious groups were overrepresented in the new Congress. Jews make up 2% of the U.S. population but 6% of the new Congress (or 33 members). Catholics, who make up about 20% of the U.S. population, comprise 30% of the new Congress (or 158 members). Likewise, Presbyterians, Episcopalians and Methodists were also overrepresented. (Pew found 26 identified as Anglican or Episcopalian.)Pentecostals were underrepresented. They make up 0.4% of Congress vs. 5% of all U.S. adults.Among other findings:There are nine Mormons, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in the 117th Congress.The new Congress, like the old, has three Muslim representatives: Reps. André Carson, Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib.It also has two Buddhists: Rep. Hank Johnson and Sen. Mazie K. Hirono, the same two who served in the previous Congress.There are two Hindus in Congress — Rep. Ro Khanna and Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, both returning members. (Washington state Rep. Pramila Jayapal, was among those who refused to identify a religious affiliation.)Nearly all the non-Christian representatives (with the exception of three: two Jews and one who declined to state his religious affiliation) were Democrats. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ecumenical & Interreligious, Faith & Politics Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Yonat Shimron and Emily McFarlan MillerPosted Jan 5, 2021 last_img read more

5 Ways to Detox Your Spirit from this Presidential Election

first_img Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your name here Repeat after me—“all will be well.” Julian of Norwich’s famous saying applies here. Have faith that this election is not the end of the world! Have faith in the people of the United States to collectively make a decent choice. Have faith that our system—though far from perfect—has checks and balances aplenty and if it is broken (in many ways it is) we the people can move to fix it. If faith moves mountains, then let’s practice some of that faith and see what happens.I also hope you have someone in your life you can go through this detox. It helps to have a good listener around when you need to vent your election frustrations. Don’t forget, spiritual directors are trained to listen—without judgment—as you reflect on all aspects of life. If you need the support, I hope you seek it out.Teresa Blythe is an ordained United Church of Christ minister, and received an M.Div. and Diploma from the San Francisco Theological Seminary in 2000. Mama Mia 2 COMMENTS Practice humility. It’s in short supply and the ripple effect of people laying down their proverbial “swords and shields” will help our nation heal, especially after the election is over. It’s healthy to admit that you don’t know everything and what you do know could be wrong. There is such a thing as unintended consequences. So no matter who is elected—no matter how much we love or loathe them—we have no idea how their actions or policies will actually play out in the future. Remembering that makes us humble. Reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSelectionSpiritual Detox Previous article4 Ways to Make Extra Money by Using Social MediaNext articleApopka teacher arrested, charged with 22 counts Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Mama Mia Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your comment! October 30, 2016 at 9:26 pm Feeling addicted to political news and commentary? If so you’re not alone.  You may need a spiritual detox from the ridiculous amount of information coming at you daily. You may need some help weaning yourself off watching your smartphone for breaking news. You probably need a break from clearing your email inbox of frantic requests for donations. Your system may need you to hit the reset button.Here are five ways to detox from this election:Vote early and get it over with. There are probably not going to be any surprises greater than what we’ve already learned about both candidates. Vote, be done with it, and let the stress go. Take media breaks. Some people I know fast completely from media for a few days. Others are selective—they might watch the evening news but not spend hours on Facebook and Twitter. Reflect on what kind of media hypes you up the most and cut back on that. For me, it’s smartphone news updates. I’m going to have to disable those pesky notifications (that appeared without my consent) so that I’m not tempted to click on them every time I see the icon at the top of my phone. No more allowing smartphone news to ruin my lunch breaks! The presidential candidates and their croonies can’t stay away from Florida. That are hungry for the Florida votes. Trump, Hillary, Pence, Bill Clinton, Kaine, and Biden. They are wearing out the tarmac landing and taking off. You would think this is the only state in the nation. They want to win Florida badly!!! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply October 31, 2016 at 10:12 pm Free your mind and the rest will follow. At least, that is what the saying states. How can you detox from this rabid political election and the rest of the political elections that are obviously going down the toilet in terms of decency? The election countdown clock that keeps ticking away is what is giving me anxiety. The doomsday deadline. Not unlike the past, with the Y2K scare, that the world was going to be in some serious turmoil come the New Year on Jan. 1, 2000. We survived, but some very serious happenings have besieged our planet since that date, and our daily lives are not as trouble- free as before, so maybe there was something to the Y2K, as the biblical researchers predicted. The world didn’t come to a crashing halt, but just look at the world happenings now, and how badly everything is getting, sad to say. Pray for all involved. Prayer is so much better for us than worrying or gnashing our teeth in anger.  Our minds, bodies and spirits are much calmer when we choose contemplation over consternation. Jesus taught us to love and pray for our enemies, so if you feel one or more of the candidates is your enemy, pray for them. Take time from the news and re-posting to prayBy Teresa Blythe Reply last_img read more