What You Should Buy After You’ve Purchased a Camera

first_imgHave you finally made the jump to purchasing the camera you’ve been eyeing for some time? Here’s the gear that you should get next.Top image via The Film Look.Now, obviously once you’ve purchased a camera, you already know the vital things you need like batteries, a lens, and a memory card. However, once you’ve gotten the basic body build and recording capability you need, the next step can be tricky. First things first: you should consider the type of shooting you’ll be doing with the camera. Don’t think about your skill set or budget just yet. Let’s look at a few pieces of gear to consider. Nifty FiftyA tried-and-true staple of low-budget filmmaking is the 50mm lens. There’s something comforting and practical about being able to throw a cheap, light, and visually friendly lens on in no time. The benefit of shooting with a cheap f/1.8 50mm is the shallow depth of field you can get. This is will give you that warm, cinematic look that is so popular — as well as allowing you to shoot in less exposed environments.The Best Set of Go-To LensesThe Best EF Lenses for Filmmaking Under $1000How to Choose the Best Lenses for Your DSLR CameraTripodThe next most logical step for production is a durable tripod that fits the parameters of your camera. If you own a small DSLR or mirrorless camera, it makes sense to buy a tripod that’s sized accordingly. As the Film Look states, consider splurging a little bit and purchasing some hefty tripod legs, then you can always upgrade the head on your tripod as you upgrade camera size.5 Amazing Tripod Camera MovesFilmmaking Hack: Create a Handheld Camera Rig for Less than $5SliderOnce you’ve mastered the art of panning and tilting with your tripod, the next step will be actual dynamic camera movement. Purchasing a slider is something of a contentious point for filmmakers. Either you want to take the full DIY approach and build one yourself, or you could save some time and frustration and go for the name brand that you know and love. Either way, if you’re looking to improve the look and feel of your work, having a slider on deck will guarantee some solid B-roll and micro-tracking shots that will boost the overall value of your production.DSLR Slider Guide For Solo ShootersLone Operator? Make Your Next Purchase a Motorized SliderDIY Hacks: 10 Cheap Tripod Dolly Options to Try at HomeMicrophoneAnybody who has ever worked with any camera knows the in-camera microphone is complete garbage. But that’s okay because finding cheap, good-quality audio recording solutions is easier than ever. RODE currently runs the show with their on-camera Video Mic Pro, which attaches directly to the camera. This spares you from relying on a boom or finding another crew member. However, to capture even better audio, if your subject is stationary, you can attach your microphone to a stand (that could be part of your microphone purchase). Like the tripod and lens, just consider the type of video work you’ll be doing.The Best Microphones for Sit-Down InterviewsRode Announces the VideoMic Pro Plus Shotgun MicrophoneLightingLighting can be a difficult area to break into right away. Learning the various color temperatures and types of light and their particular settings can take some time and experience. But, for starting out, it can’t hurt to snag a few cheap LED lights and stands. The Film Look recommends also purchasing a cheap reflector if you’ll be consistently shooting interviews or in static locations.LED Lights Under $500 Every Filmmaker Needs On SetGo Remote with Compact LED Lights4 Cheap Practical Lights That Can Work Wonders On SetBuy UsedIt never hurts to buy used equipment. Almost every camera I’ve ever owned I’ve purchased used, and there’s never been anything wrong with them other than a few nicks and dings (which did not affect the overall performance of the camera). Buying used is a great way to save money, and it will allow you to accrue more gear more quickly.What You Need To Know When Buying a Used DSLRlast_img read more

Directly Attacking Your Competitor Creates Resistance

first_imgThe weakest choice available when trying to create a compelling reason for your dream client to consider leaving their existing supplier (or partner, as the case may be) is to directly attack your competitor. This approach creates resistance, and you cause your prospective client to defend their existing supplier—and their choice.You can’t win new clients by competitively displacing your competitors without uncovering the problems and challenges that caused them to consider moving their business to you and your company. You have a list of the areas where your competitors struggle, and it is useful to know what your dream client’s hot buttons are likely to be. A direct assault on your competitor creates resistance, not dissatisfaction.You say, “I’ve heard that XYZ is having this problem, that problem, and the other problem. I’m wondering if you are having those problems, too.” You’re hoping they say, “Why, yes, I am having those problems. Where do I sign?” That, however, is not what you hear. Instead, you hear, “No. I am not having those problems.”By recounting your competitor’s many sins, you cause your dream client to defend them from your attack. Who was the person that chose to work with this company you have described as inept? Who is still working with this very same company?You don’t move people to change by causing them to resist and defend their prior decision.The better choice is to speak well of your competitor, speak well of the people who work there, talk about the differences in your models, and share how some of the choices the alternatives in your industry make it difficult for them to produce the results you generate.By speaking well of your competitor, you eliminate the need for your dream client to defend them. When they don’t need to mount a defense, they’re more open to sharing with you what might compel them to change. Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more

GNFC to facilitate digital transition of residential townships

first_imgAhmedabad: The NITI Aayog has appointed the State-owned Gujarat Narmada Valley Fertilizers & Chemicals Limited (GNFC) as the nodal agency to facilitate digital transition of residential townships across the country.After demonetisation, GNFC’s township in Bharuch was the first residential colony to adopt digital modes of payments. The firm’s digital drive was headed by it’s information technology division (n)Code Solutions. Impressed with the initiative, the NITI Aayog appointed the firm to replicate its model across the country.Last week, in Nagpur, Prime Minister Narendra Modi had launched GNFC facilitated 81 less-cash townships in 12 States.The 81 townships include those of Central public sector companies, like ONGC, Indian Oil, NTPC, SAIL, BHEL, NMDC, CRPF, BSF and Police Lines, and private sector townships, like Reliance, Essar, Adani, Birla Aditya, Welspun. As of now, the initiative covers the townships Delhi, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Bihar, and Chhattisgarh.The townships cover a population of around 2 lakh and are collectively doing about 2.5 lakh transactions everyday — almost 9 crore transactions in a year.After the demonetisation, the GNFC had launched a drive to ensure that fertilizers and other products in its outlets were booked and sold using digital payment options, like credit or debit cards, e-wallets, and net banking channels.last_img read more

Goa Minister’s driver fined for rash driving

first_imgGoa Water Resources Minister Vinod Palyekar’s driver was fined ₹600 for rash and negligent driving on Mandovi bridge near here on Friday morning. A social activist video-taped the vehicle overtaking a car and complained to the traffic police.“An incident happened in Goa, while I am on an official visit out of the State. My official vehicle driven by my driver, while taking it from Verna showroom to my residence after servicing, was found overtaking on Mandovi bridge,” Mr. Palyekar, who is on an official visit to Uttar Pradesh, tweeted and posted on Facebook on Friday.He asked Goa Director of Transport to direct the enforcement wing to issue a challan against his driver. Overtaking is not allowed on bridges is Goa, according to the motor vehicles rules.last_img

PDP-BJP government anti-youth: Omar Abdullah

first_imgFormer Jammu and Kashmir chief minister Omar Abdullah said on Saturday that the youth of the State had been left in lurch by a nepotistic and anti-youth PDP-BJP coalition government. Hard-working, meritorious and qualified youth of the state are being pushed against the wall because of open political patronage to nepotism and an unprecedented chaos in recruitment, competitive examinations and at service commissions, Omar, the working president of opposition National Conference (NC), said here. He was addressing a one-day meet of youth NC provincial body at the party headquarters, Nawa-e-Subha. Omar said the state has highly qualified and talented youth who have given their sweat and blood to be equipped with great academic credentials, but that the present dispensation seemed hell-bent to alienate them after robbing them of their merit and rights. The NC working president said the “deteriorating” law and order situation and the “instability” in the state in the past three years had a direct bearing on the future of the youth. It is the youth that suffers the most due to the government’s inability to preserve and nurture peace and stability. It affects their studies, robs them of employment opportunities and creates a sense of hopelessness that is dangerous considering the circumstances in the state. The biggest injustices with the youth are being perpetuated while the government has precious little to offer apart from rhetoric and photo opportunities, he said. Omar said rising unemployment in the state was a matter of grave concern and was a telling indictment of the failed policies of the present government. Our unemployment numbers are rising and could well have crossed a million unemployed skilled and unskilled young men if an objective analysis is undertaken. With the complete collapse of the tourism sector and zero headway in encouraging a private sector growth, diminishing jobs in the public sector have created an alarming situation. Especially, how even those limited jobs in the public sector seem to be reserved for the kith and kin of the ruling alliance leaders, he said. He asked the party’s youth wing to reach out to the youth and empower them politically to become opinion-makers and stake holders in finding solutions to these problems. “Be it the aim of curbing nepotism, of fighting corruption, of holding the government accountable or of ushering the state into a corrective era of growth, peace and progress, our youth hold the key. They have the answers to the problems that plague our state and their voice should be amplified and represented at every policy level,” Mr. Abdullah said.last_img read more

Trupti Desai alleges death threat ; to seek police protection

first_imgBhumata Brigade leader Trupti Desai on Monday said she would be seeking police protection after having allegedly received a string of death threats since she announced her intention to worship at Sabarimala temple in Kerala following the Supreme Court verdict allowing women of all ages to enter the temple.Ms. Desai said she had received more than 200 posts of an extremely offensive nature — several among them threats to her life — since Friday last week on her Facebook page threatening her with dire consequences if she attempted to visit Sabarimala. “Since I approved of the SC verdict and announced my decision to visit the temple, I have been bombarded with a continuous stream of death threats and expletives. My fake pictures are circulating on social media in a bid to tarnish my reputation. While I have received threats in the past, the magnitude and the incessant profanities in the posts this time is appalling,” Ms. Desai told The Hindu.She said she would be requesting the Pune Commissioner of Police to grant her protection in Pune as well as during her visit to the temple in Kerala.“We have not yet fixed the date for the Sabarimala visit, but it would probably be sometime after Diwali,” she said, adding that she was undeterred by the threats, and was more than ever determined to offer worship at Sabarimala.Ms. Desai’s highly publicised temple-entry ‘crusades’ over the past few years to demolish gender barriers at shrines across Maharashtra has led to temple trustees opening the inner sanctum of the historic Shani Shingnapur Temple in Ahmednagar district to women in April 2016.She had also mounted a campaign to seek entry for women in the core area of the Haji Ali Dargah in Mumbai. Ms. Desai had written more than once to the Sabarimala trustees, demanding entry to women of all ages.“It is patently unjust to debar women for a whole month, owing to their menstruating cycle. We strongly challenge these outmoded notions of purity and deem it a gross injustice to devotees of Lord Ayappa,” Ms. Desai had said in a letter in 2016, exhorting the trustees to take “an historic decision” by ending the gender discrimination once and for all by lifting the ban.In December last year, she had announced her decision to visit the temple, but called it off owing to a potential law and order situation.last_img read more

Fresh landslides hit Jammu-Srinagar NH

first_imgFresh landslides struck several places along the Jammu-Srinagar National Highway which remained closed for the seventh consecutive day on Tuesday. Authorities are hopeful of clearing the debris and making the road traffic-worthy by this afternoon. The road clearance operation is going on in full swing. The massive landslide at Maroog was cleared but fresh landslides occurred at several places between Ramsu and Panthiyal overnight and it might take another five to six hours to clear the highway provided there are no more landslides, Deputy Superintendent of Police (Traffic, National Highway, Ramban), Suresh Sharma told PTI. Barring this problematic 12-km stretch from Ramsu to Panthiyal, he said the road is almost through and nearly two dozen oil tankers and trucks carrying LPG cylinders, which were stranded near Maroog, proceeded towards Srinagar after the clearance of the landslide Tuesday morning. The highway was closed for traffic on Wednesday following heavy snowfall and incessant rains which triggered avalanches and landslides at various places especially on Qazigund-Banihal-Ramban stretch including Jawahar Tunnel – the gateway to Kashmir Valley.Mr. Sharma said several landslides occurred overnight at Anokhi fall, Kella morh and Panthiyal and men and machinery are on the job to remove the debris.Once the operation is complete, the Kashmir-bound stranded vehicles will be allowed to move towards their destination, he said adding the decision to allow fresh traffic on the highway will be taken later in the day after reviewing the situation. Officials said the eastern tube of Jawahar Tunnel, north portal side, which was blocked by a snow avalanche on Thursday, was made traffic worthy on Monday evening. In view of the closure of the highway, the Indian Air Force (IAF) had so far airlifted over 1400 stranded passengers including students since Friday. The weatherman has predicted another spell of snowfall and rains across the state from Tuesday evening. A fresh western disturbance is likely to affect the state from Tuesday evening to Friday noon. The system will move from north west to south east and again the Pirpanjal range from Gulmarg to Bhaderwah will have moderate to heavy rain or snow especially on February 13 and 14, a spokesman of the MET department said.last_img read more

AAP may ally with SAD breakaway outfit: Kejriwal

first_imgThe Aam Aadmi Party and a breakaway outfit of the Shiromani Akali Dal are in talks for an alliance in Punjab for the Lok Sabha election, Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal said on Tuesday.He said a final decision on whether an alliance with the SAD (Taksali) would be formed or not would be taken in a couple of days. “Bhagwat Mann [AAP Punjab convener] is in talks with the Akali Dal [Taksali] over an alliance and a decision would be taken soon,” Mr. Kejriwal said. The move came after talks for an alliance between the SAD (Taksali) and the Punjab Democratic Alliance failed over the sharing of seats. Earlier, the SAD (Taksali) had been holding talks with the PDA that comprises former AAP leader Sukhpal Khaira’s Punjab Ekta Party, Bahujan Samaj Party, Lok Insaaf Party and Punjab Manch. The SAD (Taksali) wanted to field its candidate, Bir Devinder Singh, from the Anandpur Sahib seat, while the PDA insisted on this seat for the BSP. The SAD (Taksali) was formed by MP Ranjit Singh Brahmpura and former MP Rattan Singh Ajnala and Sewa Singh Sekhwan after they were expelled from the Akali Dal for revolting against party chief Sukhbir Singh Badal. Punjab has 13 parliamentary constituencies.last_img read more

Aerial Drones Reveal Hidden Archaeology

first_imgArchaeologists spend much of their professional lives in holes, digging deep underground to discover the remains of ancient communities and cultures. But now, some of them are taking to the skies—with a little help from drones. By outfitting these unmanned craft with thermal cameras, archaeologists have discovered a new and affordable way of seeing what’s underground while flying high above it.Thermal imaging has been “the unexplored frontier” in archaeology for a long time, says Jesse Casana, an archaeologist at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. The idea behind the technique is simple: Over the course of a day and a night, different parts of a landscape heat up and cool down at different rates. Buried stones, for example, tend to retain heat longer than dry soil around them does. That means that in the early morning, the stones will be much warmer than the surrounding earth. Those temperature differences are invisible to our eyes, but a thermal camera—which detects infrared light, otherwise known as heat—can easily record and reveal them. And if those buried stones happen to be the remains of ancient buildings, that camera has just taken a picture of a lost settlement without digging a single hole.But how do you get a thermal camera up in the air to take those pictures? In the past, archaeologists have tried everything from small planes and helicopters to hot air balloons and kites. Casana recalls that one team even sent a graduate student up in a powered parachute—basically a flying go-kart—to snap thermal pictures of a site while leaning over the side. They got “amazing results,” but the technique was time-consuming, expensive, and dangerous, Casana says. So he started thinking about alternatives. What kind of contraption could fly a thermal camera over a large area without much help from humans on the ground—and do it for not very much money? Then it hit him: a drone.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Drones, otherwise known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), are becoming increasingly popular in many kinds of scientific research. They can fly for about 15 minutes on their own, covering much larger areas than a balloon or kite can. Plus, they are cheap (and getting cheaper); anyone can buy a kit and build their own UAV for just a few hundred dollars. All Casana needed to do was strap a thermal camera onto one, program a flight plan over an archaeological site, and wait for its buried features to be revealed.Casana took his drone setup to a known ancient settlement site in northern New Mexico called Blue J. Occupied from about 600 C.E to 1150 C.E. by people known as Ancestral Puebloans, Blue J was populated at the same time as sites around Chaco Canyon, about 70 kilometers to the north. But unlike better studied Ancestral Puebloan settlements, Blue J is buried under a meter of desert sand. Most of its ancient stone architecture is obscured, and it’s hard for archaeologists to even know where to start digging.By sending the thermal camera on four, 11-minute drone flights over Blue J, each at a different time of day, Casana and his team revealed many of the community’s buried structures. Not only did the thermal images accurately record most of the known buildings at Blue J, but they also revealed that some of these structures were much larger than archaeologists previously thought, the researchers report in this month’s Journal of Archaeological Science. Thanks to the drone, the team may have even spotted a great kiva, a type of underground ceremonial structure found in most Ancestral Puebloan communities but, strangely, not yet in Blue J. That’s the kind of discovery that can help future teams of archaeologists pinpoint the most promising places to begin their excavations, Casana says.Drones outfitted with imaging technology such as thermal cameras have “become an amazing tool for identifying archaeological sites and figuring out where excavations should take place,” agrees Austin Hill, a research scientist at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, who has used UAVs for surveys of archaeological sites in the Middle East and was not involved in the Blue J work. There’s just one problem, he says: Drones are “prone to falling out of the sky.” UAVs are still a relatively new technology, prone to glitches and failures. There’s “a steep learning curve” just to get to the point where your drone doesn’t crash every time you try to fly it, Casana says. Luckily, replacement parts are cheap, and like many young technologies, UAVs are improving rapidly. Soon, they may be as indispensable to archaeologists as shovels and trowels—if not quite as easy to use.last_img read more

Even in the Wild, Mice Run on Wheels

first_imgIn 2009, neurophysiologist Johanna Meijer set up an unusual experiment in her backyard. In an ivy-tangled corner of her garden, she and her colleagues at Leiden University in the Netherlands placed a rodent running wheel inside an open cage and trained a motion-detecting infrared camera on the scene. Then they put out a dish of food pellets and chocolate crumbs to attract animals to the wheel and waited.Wild house mice discovered the food in short order, then scampered into the wheel and started to run. Rats, shrews, and even frogs found their way to the wheel—more than 200,000 animals over 3 years. The creatures seemed to relish the feeling of running without going anywhere.The study “puts a nail in the coffin” of the debate over whether mice and rats will run on wheels in a natural setting, says Ted Garland, an evolutionary physiologist at the University of California, Riverside, who was not involved in the work. More importantly, he says, the findings suggest that like (some) humans, mice and other animals may simply exercise because they like to. Figuring out why certain strains of mice are more sedentary than others could help shed light on genetic differences between more active and sedentary people, he adds. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Even before Meijer got creative in her yard, researchers knew that captive mice are exercise maniacs. In laboratories and bedrooms, they frequently log more than 5 km per night on stationary running wheels. But scientists didn’t know why the animals did it.One thing was clear: They seem to enjoy it. Mice find exercise rewarding; just as they can be trained to press a lever dozens of times to release a pellet of food or a dose of cocaine, the rodents will go to great lengths to unlock a running wheel when it has a brake on, and get back to spinning, Garland says. But is the drive to run normal, or is it an aberrant, obsessive behavior triggered by living in a shoebox-sized cage?Meijer’s work seems to have answered that question. On average, the backyard mice she and colleagues observed ran in 1 to 2 minute stints, roughly the same duration as that seen in lab mice, they report online today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The team also set up a second wheel in a nearby nature preserve of grassy dunes and attracted a similar crowd of enthusiasts. The animals kept running even when Meijer removed the food from the garden site, although they came in smaller numbers, she notes. Sometimes the rodents were so eager to run that they couldn’t wait to take turns, she says: At one point, a large mouse sent a smaller mouse flying when it climbed on to the wheel and started running in the opposite direction.The fact that the wild mice and other animals were bold enough to enter the cage and use the wheel is “very weird,” but perhaps not as surprising when one considers that many domesticated animals also like to run on wheels, including dogs and chickens, says Justin Rhodes, a neuroscientist at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.Although the common house mice observed in the study tend to be more leery of novel structures than other species—an evolutionary adaptation to the human penchant for building mousetraps—Garland suggests that the wheel may provide a more secure way for the animals to run than darting across an open field. “There’s something attractive about being able to get in a wheel and run unfettered.”last_img read more

How much does the public support animal research? Depends on the question

first_imgEmbattled U.K. biomedical researchers are drawing some comfort from a new survey showing that a sizable majority of the public continues to support the use of animals in research. But there’s another twist that should interest social scientists as well: The government’s decision this year to field two almost identical surveys on the topic offers fresh evidence that the way you ask a question affects how people answer it.Since 1999, the U.K. Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) has been funding a survey of 1000 adults about their attitudes toward animal experimentation. But this year the government asked the London-based pollsters, Ipsos MORI, to carry out a new survey, changing the wording of several questions. (The company also collected additional information, including public attitudes toward different animal species and current rules regarding their use.)For example, the phrase “animal experimentation” was replaced by “animal research” because the latter is “less inflammatory,” notes Ipsos MORI Research Manager Jerry Latter. In addition, says Emma Brown, a BIS spokeswoman, the word research “more accurately reflects the range of procedures that animals may be involved in, including the breeding of genetically modified animals.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)But government officials also value the information about long-term trends in public attitudes that can be gleaned from the current survey. So they told the company to conduct one last round—the 10th in the series—at the same time they deployed the new survey. Each survey went to a representative, but different, sample of U.K. adults.The changes in wording seem to have given animal researchers a bit of a ratings bump. In the new survey, some 68% agreed that “I can accept the use of animals in scientific research as long as it is for medical research purposes and there is no alternative.” By comparison, only 64% of respondents to the ongoing (trends) survey said yes when asked if they “can accept animal experimentation so long as it is for medical research purposes.” Although still strongly positive, that number was down from the roughly 75% recorded throughout the previous decade (the figure had dipped to 66% in 2012).One confounding factor in the new survey is the addition of a reference to “no alternatives.” When that phrase is added to a comparable question in the trends survey, the positive response drops from 64% to 60%.The use of the word “medical” seems to have an even larger impact on public attitudes. When the trends survey asked a question that didn’t use the word “medical,” i.e., “I agree with animal experimentation for all types of research where there is no alternative,” only 47% of respondents say yes. And the positive response to the comparable question in the new survey is even lower. Only 37% say “it is acceptable to use animals for all types of research where there is no alternative.”Despite these subtleties, U.K. scientists believe the surveys show that the public will stand behind them if they speak out. “In the past, many scientists were understandably afraid of talking about their use of animals, but the climate has very much changed,” says Frances Rawle, head of policy at the Medical Research Council. “We encourage our researchers to be open about this work because it’s important that the public … are aware that research using animals is still an important and very necessary part of medical science.”At the same time, the new survey reveals that many people don’t understand what animal research is now being done and how it is regulated. For example, nearly one in three say that scientists in the United Kingdom can use animals to test cosmetics even though the practice has been banned for more than 15 years. Only 30% feel they are “well informed” about the use of animals in research, and some 55% would like to know more about efforts to find alternatives and improve animal welfare.That level of ignorance worries government officials. “It is of concern that most people feel uninformed about the use of animals in research,” BIS’s Brown says. “The lack of knowledge could be impacting people’s view of the need for animal research and their perception of the regulatory system around it.”last_img read more

Indian American Technologist Nambi Seshadri Honored with the IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal

first_imgThe Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers recently announced that it has awarded Nambi Seshadri with its prestigious Alexander Graham Bell Medal.Seshadri, Indian American chief technologist at San Jose, Calif.-based Quantenna Communications Inc., was selected for the honor for his exceptional contributions to wireless, networking and engineering. In addition to this high honor, Seshadri’s prize consists of a gold medal, a bronze replica, a certificate, and an honorarium, according to a Quantenna Dec. 5 news release.“The innovations by Nambi form the basis for some of today’s Wi-Fi and other wireless networking standards and systems, now in use by billions of Wi-Fi users,” said Dr. Sam Heidari, chairman and chief executive at Quantenna. “We are honored to have such a distinguished and accomplished chief technologist on our team. The process is extraordinarily competitive, this is a great lifetime accomplishment and one of the most prestigious honors that one may receive in our field.”Read it at India West Related Itemslast_img read more

126 Arrested In Biggest Noida Fake Call Centre Bust In Indo-US-Canada Op

first_imgA group of officials from the FBI of the US and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police flew down to India in July. They called on the chief of the police in Noida in a meeting coordinated by the Interpol. The details of the closed-door meeting held at the police headquarters in Gautam Buddh Nagar never emerged in the public domain until a series of raids were reported in the months that followed after a massive crackdown began on fake call centres that duped foreigners.Read it at NDTV Related Itemslast_img

India Asks ICC To Snap Ties With Terror Supporting Nations

first_imgThe Indian cricket board (BCCI) has written to the game’s governing body urging the cricket community to sever ties with any nation from where “terrorism emanates”, its chief administrator said on Friday.The move follows a suicide-bomber attack last week that killed 40 Indian paramilitary troops in disputed Kashmir. The attack, the worst ever in the troubled area, was claimed by Pakistan-based militants. Read it at Channel News Asia Related Itemslast_img